Capsule endoscopy for obscure gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with comorbid rheumatic diseases

Neal Shahidi, George Ou, Jessica Tong, Ricky Kwok, Cherry Galorport, Joanna K. Law, Robert Enns

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background and Aim. We evaluated the association between patients with rheumatic diseases (RD) suffering from obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB) and positive capsule endoscopy (CE) findings. Methods. All CE procedures performed on patients with RD and OGIB were assessed from a large database at St. Paul's Hospital (Vancouver, BC, Canada) between December 2001 and April 2011. A positive finding on CE was defined as any pathology, including ulcers/erosions, vascular lesions, and mass lesions, perceived to be the source of bleeding. Results. Of the 1133 CEs performed, 41 (4%) complete CEs were for OGIB in patients with RD. Of these, 54% presented with overt bleeding. Mean age was 66 years. Positive findings were seen in 61% of patients. Ulcerations/erosions (36%) and vascular lesions (36%) were the most common findings. Significant differences between the RD versus non-RD populations included: inpatient status, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAIDs) use, oral steroid use, and mean Charlson index score (all P≤0.008). Similar nonsignificant trends were seen between positive and negative CEs among the RD population. Conclusions. The correlation between RD and positive CE findings is likely influenced by ongoing anti-inflammatory drug use, poorer health status, and a predisposition for angiodysplastic lesions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number534345
JournalDiagnostic and Therapeutic Endoscopy
Volume2014
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

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