Cancer drug discovery through collaboration

Christoph Lengauer, Luis A. Diaz, Saurabh Saha

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

It has been two decades since cancer was first described as a genetic disease and researchers offered the promise of early diagnosis and targeted therapies. Today, most cancer patients still await life-saving treatments. Genomics and other '-omics' technologies have revealed a complexity among cancers that makes almost any tumour genetically unique; as a consequence, effective targeted therapies might be suitable only for small subgroups of patients. We suggest that by merging and organizing their core competencies, academia, biotechnology companies and the pharmaceutical industry can address existing bottlenecks in anticancer drug discovery and development.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)375-380
Number of pages6
JournalNature Reviews Drug Discovery
Volume4
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2005

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Drug Discovery
Neoplasms
Inborn Genetic Diseases
Drug Industry
Biotechnology
Genomics
Early Diagnosis
Therapeutics
Research Personnel
Technology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Medicine
  • Drug Discovery

Cite this

Cancer drug discovery through collaboration. / Lengauer, Christoph; Diaz, Luis A.; Saha, Saurabh.

In: Nature Reviews Drug Discovery, Vol. 4, No. 5, 05.2005, p. 375-380.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lengauer, C, Diaz, LA & Saha, S 2005, 'Cancer drug discovery through collaboration', Nature Reviews Drug Discovery, vol. 4, no. 5, pp. 375-380. https://doi.org/10.1038/nrd1722
Lengauer, Christoph ; Diaz, Luis A. ; Saha, Saurabh. / Cancer drug discovery through collaboration. In: Nature Reviews Drug Discovery. 2005 ; Vol. 4, No. 5. pp. 375-380.
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