Can we eradicate measles?

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Because humans are the only hosts for measles virus, recovery from disease provides lifelong immunity, and the vaccine provides long-term protection from infection, measles eradication is feasible. Despite considerable effort, measles remains one of the 10 most important causes of death due to infectious diseases and one of the most common causes of vaccine-preventable death in children. Several factors make measles harder to eradicate than was smallpox, including its greater infectiousness and greater difficulties in administering the vaccine, in carrying out surveillance, and in detecting infected individuals. Vaccine coverage is complicated in developing countries by the need for two doses of vaccine and, in developed countries, by parents not allowing their children to be vaccinated; approaches to solving these problems include education programs and efforts to develop new vaccines and delivery methods.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)409-413
Number of pages5
JournalMicrobe
Volume1
Issue number9
StatePublished - Sep 2006

Fingerprint

Measles
Vaccines
Measles virus
Smallpox
Virus Diseases
Developed Countries
Developing Countries
Communicable Diseases
Cause of Death
Immunity
Parents
Education
Infection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology

Cite this

Can we eradicate measles? / Griffin, Diane; Moss, William J.

In: Microbe, Vol. 1, No. 9, 09.2006, p. 409-413.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Griffin, D & Moss, WJ 2006, 'Can we eradicate measles?', Microbe, vol. 1, no. 9, pp. 409-413.
Griffin, Diane ; Moss, William J. / Can we eradicate measles?. In: Microbe. 2006 ; Vol. 1, No. 9. pp. 409-413.
@article{66bbf5ef26c74816960b1487133873f9,
title = "Can we eradicate measles?",
abstract = "Because humans are the only hosts for measles virus, recovery from disease provides lifelong immunity, and the vaccine provides long-term protection from infection, measles eradication is feasible. Despite considerable effort, measles remains one of the 10 most important causes of death due to infectious diseases and one of the most common causes of vaccine-preventable death in children. Several factors make measles harder to eradicate than was smallpox, including its greater infectiousness and greater difficulties in administering the vaccine, in carrying out surveillance, and in detecting infected individuals. Vaccine coverage is complicated in developing countries by the need for two doses of vaccine and, in developed countries, by parents not allowing their children to be vaccinated; approaches to solving these problems include education programs and efforts to develop new vaccines and delivery methods.",
author = "Diane Griffin and Moss, {William J}",
year = "2006",
month = "9",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "1",
pages = "409--413",
journal = "ASM News",
issn = "1558-7452",
publisher = "American Society for Microbiology",
number = "9",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Can we eradicate measles?

AU - Griffin, Diane

AU - Moss, William J

PY - 2006/9

Y1 - 2006/9

N2 - Because humans are the only hosts for measles virus, recovery from disease provides lifelong immunity, and the vaccine provides long-term protection from infection, measles eradication is feasible. Despite considerable effort, measles remains one of the 10 most important causes of death due to infectious diseases and one of the most common causes of vaccine-preventable death in children. Several factors make measles harder to eradicate than was smallpox, including its greater infectiousness and greater difficulties in administering the vaccine, in carrying out surveillance, and in detecting infected individuals. Vaccine coverage is complicated in developing countries by the need for two doses of vaccine and, in developed countries, by parents not allowing their children to be vaccinated; approaches to solving these problems include education programs and efforts to develop new vaccines and delivery methods.

AB - Because humans are the only hosts for measles virus, recovery from disease provides lifelong immunity, and the vaccine provides long-term protection from infection, measles eradication is feasible. Despite considerable effort, measles remains one of the 10 most important causes of death due to infectious diseases and one of the most common causes of vaccine-preventable death in children. Several factors make measles harder to eradicate than was smallpox, including its greater infectiousness and greater difficulties in administering the vaccine, in carrying out surveillance, and in detecting infected individuals. Vaccine coverage is complicated in developing countries by the need for two doses of vaccine and, in developed countries, by parents not allowing their children to be vaccinated; approaches to solving these problems include education programs and efforts to develop new vaccines and delivery methods.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=33845501143&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=33845501143&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:33845501143

VL - 1

SP - 409

EP - 413

JO - ASM News

JF - ASM News

SN - 1558-7452

IS - 9

ER -