Can Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment Education and Clinical Exposure Affect Nursing Students’ Stigma Perception Toward Alcohol and Opioid Use?

Khadejah F. Mahmoud, Deborah Finnell, Dawn Lindsay, Carolyn MacFarland, Hannah D. Marze, Britney B. Scolieri, Ann M. Mitchell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Alcohol and/or opioid stigma perceptions are barriers to screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT) implementation. AIM: To examine SBIRT education and clinical exposure efficacy at decreasing nursing students’ stigma perceptions toward caring for patients affected by alcohol and/or opioid use problems. METHOD: A single-sample, pretest–posttest design with N = 124 nursing students. The students had a 1.5-hour SBIRT education session and a 12-week clinical experience with some patients who had alcohol and/or opioid use problems. RESULTS: The participants’ stigma perceptions improved toward patients who had alcohol and/or opioid use problems. CONCLUSIONS: SBIRT education and clinical exposure may provide a basis for promoting understanding of alcohol and/or opioid use–related stigma and can be used as an intervention to decrease some of stigma’s negative effects.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)467-475
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of the American Psychiatric Nurses Association
Volume25
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2019

Keywords

  • alcohol
  • nursing
  • opioids
  • stigma
  • undergraduate

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Phychiatric Mental Health

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