Can lay responder defibrillation programmes improve survival to hospital discharge following an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest?

Leigh M. Smith, Patricia M Davidson, Elizabeth J. Halcomb, Sharon Andrew

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Introduction: The importance of early defibrillation in improving outcomes and reducing morbidity following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest underscores the importance of examining novel approaches to treatment access. The increasing evidence to support the importance of early defibrillation has increased attention on the potential for lay responders to deliver this therapy. Aim: This paper seeks to critically review the literature that evaluates the impact of lay responder defibrillator programs on survival to hospital discharge following an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in the adult population. Method: The electronic databases, Medline and CINAHL, were searched using keywords including; "first responder", "lay responder", "defibrillation" and "cardiac arrest". The reference lists of retrieved articles and the Internet were also searched. Articles were included in the review if they reported primary data, in the English language, which described the effect of a lay responder defibrillation program on survival to hospital discharge from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in adults. Results: Eleven studies met the inclusion criteria. The small number of published studies, heterogeneity of study populations and study outcome methods prohibited formal meta-analysis. Therefore, narrative analysis was undertaken. Studies included in this report provided inconsistent findings in relation to survival to hospital discharge following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Conclusion: Although there are limited data, the role of the lay responder appears promising in improving the outcome from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest following early defibrillation. Despite the inherent methodological difficulties in studying this population, future research should address outcomes related to morbidity, mortality and cost-effectiveness.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)137-145
Number of pages9
JournalAustralian Critical Care
Volume20
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2007
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest
Morbidity
Defibrillators
Population Characteristics
Heart Arrest
Internet
Population
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Meta-Analysis
Language
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Databases
Mortality

Keywords

  • Automated external defibrillator
  • Cardiac arrest
  • Cardiopulmonary resuscitation
  • Defibrillation
  • Out-of-hospital arrest
  • Resuscitation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Emergency
  • Critical Care

Cite this

Can lay responder defibrillation programmes improve survival to hospital discharge following an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest? / Smith, Leigh M.; Davidson, Patricia M; Halcomb, Elizabeth J.; Andrew, Sharon.

In: Australian Critical Care, Vol. 20, No. 4, 11.2007, p. 137-145.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{f43a9bc151b0482d838aa730049c8bce,
title = "Can lay responder defibrillation programmes improve survival to hospital discharge following an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest?",
abstract = "Introduction: The importance of early defibrillation in improving outcomes and reducing morbidity following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest underscores the importance of examining novel approaches to treatment access. The increasing evidence to support the importance of early defibrillation has increased attention on the potential for lay responders to deliver this therapy. Aim: This paper seeks to critically review the literature that evaluates the impact of lay responder defibrillator programs on survival to hospital discharge following an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in the adult population. Method: The electronic databases, Medline and CINAHL, were searched using keywords including; {"}first responder{"}, {"}lay responder{"}, {"}defibrillation{"} and {"}cardiac arrest{"}. The reference lists of retrieved articles and the Internet were also searched. Articles were included in the review if they reported primary data, in the English language, which described the effect of a lay responder defibrillation program on survival to hospital discharge from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in adults. Results: Eleven studies met the inclusion criteria. The small number of published studies, heterogeneity of study populations and study outcome methods prohibited formal meta-analysis. Therefore, narrative analysis was undertaken. Studies included in this report provided inconsistent findings in relation to survival to hospital discharge following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Conclusion: Although there are limited data, the role of the lay responder appears promising in improving the outcome from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest following early defibrillation. Despite the inherent methodological difficulties in studying this population, future research should address outcomes related to morbidity, mortality and cost-effectiveness.",
keywords = "Automated external defibrillator, Cardiac arrest, Cardiopulmonary resuscitation, Defibrillation, Out-of-hospital arrest, Resuscitation",
author = "Smith, {Leigh M.} and Davidson, {Patricia M} and Halcomb, {Elizabeth J.} and Sharon Andrew",
year = "2007",
month = "11",
doi = "10.1016/j.aucc.2007.08.003",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "20",
pages = "137--145",
journal = "Australian Critical Care",
issn = "1036-7314",
publisher = "Elsevier Ireland Ltd",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Can lay responder defibrillation programmes improve survival to hospital discharge following an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest?

AU - Smith, Leigh M.

AU - Davidson, Patricia M

AU - Halcomb, Elizabeth J.

AU - Andrew, Sharon

PY - 2007/11

Y1 - 2007/11

N2 - Introduction: The importance of early defibrillation in improving outcomes and reducing morbidity following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest underscores the importance of examining novel approaches to treatment access. The increasing evidence to support the importance of early defibrillation has increased attention on the potential for lay responders to deliver this therapy. Aim: This paper seeks to critically review the literature that evaluates the impact of lay responder defibrillator programs on survival to hospital discharge following an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in the adult population. Method: The electronic databases, Medline and CINAHL, were searched using keywords including; "first responder", "lay responder", "defibrillation" and "cardiac arrest". The reference lists of retrieved articles and the Internet were also searched. Articles were included in the review if they reported primary data, in the English language, which described the effect of a lay responder defibrillation program on survival to hospital discharge from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in adults. Results: Eleven studies met the inclusion criteria. The small number of published studies, heterogeneity of study populations and study outcome methods prohibited formal meta-analysis. Therefore, narrative analysis was undertaken. Studies included in this report provided inconsistent findings in relation to survival to hospital discharge following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Conclusion: Although there are limited data, the role of the lay responder appears promising in improving the outcome from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest following early defibrillation. Despite the inherent methodological difficulties in studying this population, future research should address outcomes related to morbidity, mortality and cost-effectiveness.

AB - Introduction: The importance of early defibrillation in improving outcomes and reducing morbidity following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest underscores the importance of examining novel approaches to treatment access. The increasing evidence to support the importance of early defibrillation has increased attention on the potential for lay responders to deliver this therapy. Aim: This paper seeks to critically review the literature that evaluates the impact of lay responder defibrillator programs on survival to hospital discharge following an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in the adult population. Method: The electronic databases, Medline and CINAHL, were searched using keywords including; "first responder", "lay responder", "defibrillation" and "cardiac arrest". The reference lists of retrieved articles and the Internet were also searched. Articles were included in the review if they reported primary data, in the English language, which described the effect of a lay responder defibrillation program on survival to hospital discharge from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in adults. Results: Eleven studies met the inclusion criteria. The small number of published studies, heterogeneity of study populations and study outcome methods prohibited formal meta-analysis. Therefore, narrative analysis was undertaken. Studies included in this report provided inconsistent findings in relation to survival to hospital discharge following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Conclusion: Although there are limited data, the role of the lay responder appears promising in improving the outcome from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest following early defibrillation. Despite the inherent methodological difficulties in studying this population, future research should address outcomes related to morbidity, mortality and cost-effectiveness.

KW - Automated external defibrillator

KW - Cardiac arrest

KW - Cardiopulmonary resuscitation

KW - Defibrillation

KW - Out-of-hospital arrest

KW - Resuscitation

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=35648979606&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=35648979606&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.aucc.2007.08.003

DO - 10.1016/j.aucc.2007.08.003

M3 - Article

C2 - 17931879

AN - SCOPUS:35648979606

VL - 20

SP - 137

EP - 145

JO - Australian Critical Care

JF - Australian Critical Care

SN - 1036-7314

IS - 4

ER -