Campylobacter transmission in a Peruvian Shantytown: A longitudinal study using strain typing of Campylobacter isolates from chickens and humans in household clusters

Richard A. Oberhelman, Robert H Gilman, Patricia Sheen, Julianna Cordova, David N. Taylor, Mirko Zimic, Rina Meza, Juan Perez, Carlos LeBron, Lilia Cabrera, Frank G. Rodgers, David L. Woodward, Lawrence J. Price

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Campylobacter jejuni is a major cause of pediatric diarrhea in developing countries - free-ranging chickens are presumed to be a common source. Campylobacter strains from monthly surveillance and diarrhea cases were compared by means of restriction-fragment length polymorphism (RFLP), rapid amplified polymorphic DNA, and Lior serotyping. RFLP analysis of 156 human and 682 avian strains demonstrated identical strains in chickens and humans in 29 (70.7%) of 41 families, and 35%-39% of human isolates from diarrhea and nondiarrhea cases were identical to a household chicken isolate. Isolation of the same RFLP type from a household chicken and a human within 1 month was highly protective against diarrhea (odds ratio, 0.07; P

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)260-269
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
Volume187
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 15 2003

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Campylobacter
Longitudinal Studies
Chickens
Diarrhea
Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphisms
Serotyping
Campylobacter jejuni
Developing Countries
Odds Ratio
Pediatrics
DNA

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Immunology

Cite this

Campylobacter transmission in a Peruvian Shantytown : A longitudinal study using strain typing of Campylobacter isolates from chickens and humans in household clusters. / Oberhelman, Richard A.; Gilman, Robert H; Sheen, Patricia; Cordova, Julianna; Taylor, David N.; Zimic, Mirko; Meza, Rina; Perez, Juan; LeBron, Carlos; Cabrera, Lilia; Rodgers, Frank G.; Woodward, David L.; Price, Lawrence J.

In: Journal of Infectious Diseases, Vol. 187, No. 2, 15.01.2003, p. 260-269.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Oberhelman, RA, Gilman, RH, Sheen, P, Cordova, J, Taylor, DN, Zimic, M, Meza, R, Perez, J, LeBron, C, Cabrera, L, Rodgers, FG, Woodward, DL & Price, LJ 2003, 'Campylobacter transmission in a Peruvian Shantytown: A longitudinal study using strain typing of Campylobacter isolates from chickens and humans in household clusters', Journal of Infectious Diseases, vol. 187, no. 2, pp. 260-269. https://doi.org/10.1086/367676
Oberhelman, Richard A. ; Gilman, Robert H ; Sheen, Patricia ; Cordova, Julianna ; Taylor, David N. ; Zimic, Mirko ; Meza, Rina ; Perez, Juan ; LeBron, Carlos ; Cabrera, Lilia ; Rodgers, Frank G. ; Woodward, David L. ; Price, Lawrence J. / Campylobacter transmission in a Peruvian Shantytown : A longitudinal study using strain typing of Campylobacter isolates from chickens and humans in household clusters. In: Journal of Infectious Diseases. 2003 ; Vol. 187, No. 2. pp. 260-269.
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