Campylobacter transmission in a Peruvian Shantytown: A longitudinal study using strain typing of Campylobacter isolates from chickens and humans in household clusters

Richard A. Oberhelman, Robert H Gilman, Patricia Sheen, Julianna Cordova, David N. Taylor, Mirko Zimic, Rina Meza, Juan Perez, Carlos LeBron, Lilia Cabrera, Frank G. Rodgers, David L. Woodward, Lawrence J. Price

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Campylobacter jejuni is a major cause of pediatric diarrhea in developing countries - free-ranging chickens are presumed to be a common source. Campylobacter strains from monthly surveillance and diarrhea cases were compared by means of restriction-fragment length polymorphism (RFLP), rapid amplified polymorphic DNA, and Lior serotyping. RFLP analysis of 156 human and 682 avian strains demonstrated identical strains in chickens and humans in 29 (70.7%) of 41 families, and 35%-39% of human isolates from diarrhea and nondiarrhea cases were identical to a household chicken isolate. Isolation of the same RFLP type from a household chicken and a human within 1 month was highly protective against diarrhea (odds ratio, 0.07; P

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)260-269
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
Volume187
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 15 2003

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Immunology

Cite this

Oberhelman, R. A., Gilman, R. H., Sheen, P., Cordova, J., Taylor, D. N., Zimic, M., Meza, R., Perez, J., LeBron, C., Cabrera, L., Rodgers, F. G., Woodward, D. L., & Price, L. J. (2003). Campylobacter transmission in a Peruvian Shantytown: A longitudinal study using strain typing of Campylobacter isolates from chickens and humans in household clusters. Journal of Infectious Diseases, 187(2), 260-269. https://doi.org/10.1086/367676