Calorie restriction increases cigarette use in adult smokers

Lawrence J Cheskin, Judith M. Hess, Jack Henningfield, David A. Gorelick

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Rationale: Cigarette smokers weigh less than nonsmokers, and smokers often gain weight when they quit. This is a major barrier to smoking cessation, especially among women. However, strict dieting is not recommended during smoking cessation out of concern that it might promote relapse. This concern derives, in part, from the observation that calorie restriction increases self-administration of drugs of abuse in animals. This relationship has never been experimentally demonstrated in humans. Objectives: To evaluate whether calorie restriction increases cigarette smoking in humans. Methods: Seventeen (nine males, eight females) healthy, normal-weight smokers not attempting to quit were cycled in partially counterbalanced order, double-blind, through four diets-normal calorie (2,000-2,800 kcal/day), low calorie (700 kcal/day deficit), low-carbohydrate (CHO)/normal-calorie, and low-CHO/low-calorie-for 6 days per diet in an inpatient research ward. Smoking was assessed by cigarette counts, breath carbon monoxide (CO) levels, and cigarette craving. Results: Compared with the normal-calorie diet, while on the low-calorie diet, subjects smoked 8% more cigarettes (P

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)430-436
Number of pages7
JournalPsychopharmacology
Volume179
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2005

Fingerprint

Tobacco Products
Smoking Cessation
Diet
Smoking
Caloric Restriction
Self Administration
Street Drugs
Carbon Monoxide
Weight Gain
Inpatients
Carbohydrates
Weights and Measures
Recurrence
Research

Keywords

  • Calorie restriction
  • Cigarettes
  • Human

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology

Cite this

Cheskin, L. J., Hess, J. M., Henningfield, J., & Gorelick, D. A. (2005). Calorie restriction increases cigarette use in adult smokers. Psychopharmacology, 179(2), 430-436. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00213-004-2037-x

Calorie restriction increases cigarette use in adult smokers. / Cheskin, Lawrence J; Hess, Judith M.; Henningfield, Jack; Gorelick, David A.

In: Psychopharmacology, Vol. 179, No. 2, 05.2005, p. 430-436.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cheskin, LJ, Hess, JM, Henningfield, J & Gorelick, DA 2005, 'Calorie restriction increases cigarette use in adult smokers', Psychopharmacology, vol. 179, no. 2, pp. 430-436. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00213-004-2037-x
Cheskin, Lawrence J ; Hess, Judith M. ; Henningfield, Jack ; Gorelick, David A. / Calorie restriction increases cigarette use in adult smokers. In: Psychopharmacology. 2005 ; Vol. 179, No. 2. pp. 430-436.
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