Caloric intake, aging, and mild cognitive impairment: A population-based study

Yonas E. Geda, Marion Ragossnig, Lewis A. Roberts, Rosebud O. Roberts, V. Shane Pankratz, Teresa J H Christianson, Michelle M. Mielke, James A. Levine, Bradley F. Boeve, Ondřej Sochor, Eric G. Tangalos, David S. Knopman, Ronald C. Petersen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

In a population-based case-control study, we examined whether moderate and high caloric intakes are differentially associated with the odds of having mild cognitive impairment (MCI). The sample was derived from the Mayo Clinic Study of Aging in Olmsted County, Minnesota. Non-demented study participants aged 70-92 years (1,072 cognitively normal persons and 161 subjects with MCI) reported their caloric consumption within 1 year of the date of interview by completing a Food Frequency Questionnaire. An expert consensus panel classified each subject as either cognitively normal or having MCI based on published criteria. We conducted multivariable logistic regression analyses to compute odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) after adjusting for age, gender, education, depression, medical comorbidity, and body mass index. We also conducted stratified analyses by apolipoprotein E ε4 genotype status. Analyses were conducted in tertiles of caloric intake: 600 to 2,143 kcals per day (high caloric intake group). In the primary analysis, there was no significant difference between the moderate caloric intake group and the reference group (OR 0.87, 95% CI 0.53-1.42, p = 0.57). However, high caloric intake was associated with a nearly two-fold increased odds of having MCI (OR 1.96, 95% CI 1.26-3.06, p = 0.003) as compared to the reference group. Therefore, high caloric intake was associated with MCI but not moderate caloric intake. This association is not necessarily a cause-effect relationship.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)501-507
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Alzheimer's Disease
Volume34
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2013
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Aging
  • APOE ε4 genotype
  • caloric intake
  • mild cognitive impairment
  • population-based

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Clinical Psychology

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