California Pertussis epidemic, 2010

Kathleen Winter, Kathleen Harriman, Jennifer Zipprich, Robert Schechter, John Talarico, James Watt, Gilberto Chavez

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: In 2010, California experienced the highest number of pertussis cases in >60 years, with >9000 cases, 809 hospitalizations, and 10 deaths. This report provides a descriptive epidemiologic analysis of this epidemic and describes public health mitigation strategies that were used, including expanded pertussis vaccine recommendations. Study design: Clinical and demographic information were evaluated for all pertussis cases with onset from January 1, 2010, through December 31, 2010, and reported to the California Department of Public Health. Results: Hispanic infants younger than 6 months had the highest disease rates; all deaths and most hospitalizations occurred in infants younger than 3 months. Most pediatric cases were vaccinated according to national recommendations, although 9% of those aged 6 months to 18 years were completely unvaccinated against pertussis. High disease rates also were observed in fully vaccinated preadolescents, especially 10-year-olds. Mitigation strategies included expanded tetanus, diphtheria, and acellular pertussis vaccine recommendations, public and provider education, distribution of free vaccine for postpartum women and contacts of infants, and clinical guidance on diagnosis and treatment of pertussis in young infants. Conclusions: Infants too young to be fully vaccinated against pertussis remain at highest risk of severe disease and death. Data are needed to evaluate strategies offering direct protection of this vulnerable population, such as immunization of pregnant women and of newborns. The high rate of disease among preadolescents suggests waning of immunity from the diphtheria, tetanus, and acellular pertussis series; additional studies are warranted to evaluate the efficacy and duration of protection of the diphtheria, tetanus, and acellular pertussis series and the tetanus, diphtheria, and acellular pertussis series.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1091-1096
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Pediatrics
Volume161
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2012
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Whooping Cough
Diphtheria
Tetanus
Hospitalization
Diphtheria-Tetanus-acellular Pertussis Vaccines
Public Health
Pertussis Vaccine
Vulnerable Populations
Hispanic Americans
Postpartum Period
Pregnant Women
Immunity
Immunization
Vaccines
Demography
Newborn Infant
Pediatrics
Education

Keywords

  • ACIP
  • Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices
  • California Department of Public Health
  • CDPH
  • Diphtheria, tetanus, and acellular pertussis
  • DTaP
  • PCR
  • Polymerase chain reaction
  • Tdap
  • Tetanus, diphtheria, and acellular pertussis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Winter, K., Harriman, K., Zipprich, J., Schechter, R., Talarico, J., Watt, J., & Chavez, G. (2012). California Pertussis epidemic, 2010. Journal of Pediatrics, 161(6), 1091-1096. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpeds.2012.05.041

California Pertussis epidemic, 2010. / Winter, Kathleen; Harriman, Kathleen; Zipprich, Jennifer; Schechter, Robert; Talarico, John; Watt, James; Chavez, Gilberto.

In: Journal of Pediatrics, Vol. 161, No. 6, 12.2012, p. 1091-1096.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Winter, K, Harriman, K, Zipprich, J, Schechter, R, Talarico, J, Watt, J & Chavez, G 2012, 'California Pertussis epidemic, 2010', Journal of Pediatrics, vol. 161, no. 6, pp. 1091-1096. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpeds.2012.05.041
Winter K, Harriman K, Zipprich J, Schechter R, Talarico J, Watt J et al. California Pertussis epidemic, 2010. Journal of Pediatrics. 2012 Dec;161(6):1091-1096. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpeds.2012.05.041
Winter, Kathleen ; Harriman, Kathleen ; Zipprich, Jennifer ; Schechter, Robert ; Talarico, John ; Watt, James ; Chavez, Gilberto. / California Pertussis epidemic, 2010. In: Journal of Pediatrics. 2012 ; Vol. 161, No. 6. pp. 1091-1096.
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