Calcium regulation of neurite elongation and growth cone motility

M. P. Mattson, S. B. Kater

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Neurite outgrowth from isolated, identified molluscan (Helisoma trivolvis) neurons in culture can be suppressed by neurotransmitters and electrical activity, both of which increase intraneuronal Ca2+ levels (Haydon et al., 1984; Cohan et al., 1986, 1987). We explored the possibility of a causal relationship between Ca2+ influx from the cell exterior and neurite outgrowth using a spectrum of pharmacological manipulations known to affect transmembrane Ca2+ flux. Ca2+ ionophore A23187, an agent expected to increase Ca2+ influx, suppressed both elongation and motile growth cone structures (i.e., filodopia and lamellipodia) in a dose-dependent (10-8-106 M) and reversible manner. Furthermore, high concentrations of Ca2+ channel blockers (La3+, Cd2+, Co2+; e.g. 10-4 M La3+) suppressed both elongation and growth cone movements. These data support previous experiments, which indicated that neurite outgrowth is dependent upon a specific range of intracellular Ca2+ concentrations (Connor, 1986; Cohan et al., 1987). However, tests of the dose-dependency of the effects of Ca2+ channel blockers on outgrowth revealed that specific, low concentrations of Ca2+ channel blockers (e.g., 10-5 M La3+) caused, simultaneously, a reduction of growth cone filopodia and an acceleration of elongation. Consistent with the results using low levels of Ca2+ channel blockers, reduced extracellular Ca2+-stimulated neurite elongation while suppressing growth cone motility. Finally, neurotransmitter regulation of neurite outgrowth was shown to require influx of extracellular Ca2+; serotonin inhibition of neuron B19 was prevented by La3+ (10-5 M) or by incubation in a reduced Ca2+ environment. Taken together, these results indicate that there are optimum levels of Ca2+ influx that promote normal neurite elongation and growth cone movements; these 2 components of outgrowth appear to have differential sensitivities to Ca2+.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)4034-4043
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Neuroscience
Volume7
Issue number12
StatePublished - 1987
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Growth Cones
Neurites
Calcium
Pseudopodia
Neurotransmitter Agents
Neurons
Ionophores
Calcimycin
Serotonin
Pharmacology
Neuronal Outgrowth

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Mattson, M. P., & Kater, S. B. (1987). Calcium regulation of neurite elongation and growth cone motility. Journal of Neuroscience, 7(12), 4034-4043.

Calcium regulation of neurite elongation and growth cone motility. / Mattson, M. P.; Kater, S. B.

In: Journal of Neuroscience, Vol. 7, No. 12, 1987, p. 4034-4043.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mattson, MP & Kater, SB 1987, 'Calcium regulation of neurite elongation and growth cone motility', Journal of Neuroscience, vol. 7, no. 12, pp. 4034-4043.
Mattson, M. P. ; Kater, S. B. / Calcium regulation of neurite elongation and growth cone motility. In: Journal of Neuroscience. 1987 ; Vol. 7, No. 12. pp. 4034-4043.
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