Calcium-ATPases: Gene disorders and dysregulation in cancer

Donna Dang, Rajini Rao

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

Ca2+-ATPases belonging to the superfamily of P-type pumps play an important role in maintaining low, nanomolar cytoplasmic Ca2+ levels at rest and priming organellar stores, including the endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi, and secretory vesicles with high levels of Ca2+ for a wide range of signaling functions. In this review, we introduce the distinct subtypes of Ca2+-ATPases and their isoforms and splice variants and provide an overview of their specific cellular roles as they relate to genetic disorders and cancer, with a particular emphasis on recent findings on the secretory pathway Ca2+-ATPases (SPCA). Mutations in human ATP2A2, ATP2C1 genes, encoding housekeeping isoforms of the endoplasmic reticulum (SERCA2) and secretory pathway (SPCA1) pumps, respectively, confer autosomal dominant disorders of the skin, whereas mutations in other isoforms underlie various muscular, neurological, or developmental disorders. Emerging evidence points to an important function of dysregulated Ca2+-ATPase expression in cancers of the colon, lung, and breast where they may serve as markers of differentiation or novel targets for therapeutic intervention. We review the mechanisms underlying the link between calcium homeostasis and cancer and discuss the potential clinical relevance of these observations. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Calcium and Cell Fate. Guest Editors: Jacques Haiech, Claus Heizmann, Joachim Krebs, Thierry Capiod and Olivier Mignen.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1344-1350
Number of pages7
JournalBiochimica et Biophysica Acta - Molecular Cell Research
Volume1863
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2016

Keywords

  • Breast cancer
  • Calcium ATPase
  • Calcium signaling
  • Golgi
  • Lactation
  • Secretory pathway

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology
  • Cell Biology

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