Business Education for Plastic Surgeons: A Systematic Review, Development, and Implementation of a Business Principles Curriculum in a Residency Program

Bahar Zarrabi, Karen K. Burce, Stella M. Seal, Scott D. Lifchez, Richard J. Redett, Kevin Frick, Amir H. Dorafshar, Carisa M. Cooney

Research output: Research - peer-reviewArticle

Abstract

BACKGROUND:: Rising healthcare costs, decreasing reimbursement rates, and changes in American healthcare are forcing physicians to become increasingly business-minded. Both academic and private plastic surgeons can benefit from being educated in business principles. We conducted a systematic review to identify existing business curricula and integrated a business principles curriculum into residency training. METHODS:: We anonymously surveyed our department regarding perceived importance of business principles and performed a systematic literature review from 1993-2013 using PubMed and Embase to identify residency training programs that had designed/implemented business curricula. Subsequently, we implemented a formal, quarterly business curriculum. RESULTS:: Thirty-two (88.9%) of 36 physicians (76.6% response rate) stated business principles are either “pretty...” or “very important” to being a doctor. Only 36% of faculty and 41% of trainees had previous business instruction. We identified 434 articles in the systematic review: 29 documented formal business curricula. Twelve topics were addressed with practice management/administration (n=22) and systems-based practice (n=6) being the most common. Four articles were from surgical specialties: otolaryngology (n=1), general surgery (n=2), and combined general surgery/plastic surgery (n=1). Teaching formats included lectures and self-directed learning modules; outcomes and participant satisfaction were inconsistently reported. From August 2013-June 2015, we held eight business principles sessions. Post-session surveys demonstrated moderately-to-extremely satisfied responses in ≥75% of resident/fellow respondents (n=13, response rate=48.1%) and faculty (n=9, response rate=45.0%). DISCUSSION:: Business principles can be integrated into residency training programs. Having speakers familiar with the physician audience and a session coordinator is vital to program success.

LanguageEnglish (US)
JournalPlastic and Reconstructive Surgery
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 13 2017

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Internship and Residency
Curriculum
Education
Surgeons
Physicians
Surveys and Questionnaires
Surgical Specialties
Practice Management
Otolaryngology
Plastic Surgery
PubMed
Health Care Costs
Teaching
Learning
Delivery of Health Care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

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title = "Business Education for Plastic Surgeons: A Systematic Review, Development, and Implementation of a Business Principles Curriculum in a Residency Program",
abstract = "BACKGROUND:: Rising healthcare costs, decreasing reimbursement rates, and changes in American healthcare are forcing physicians to become increasingly business-minded. Both academic and private plastic surgeons can benefit from being educated in business principles. We conducted a systematic review to identify existing business curricula and integrated a business principles curriculum into residency training. METHODS:: We anonymously surveyed our department regarding perceived importance of business principles and performed a systematic literature review from 1993-2013 using PubMed and Embase to identify residency training programs that had designed/implemented business curricula. Subsequently, we implemented a formal, quarterly business curriculum. RESULTS:: Thirty-two (88.9%) of 36 physicians (76.6% response rate) stated business principles are either “pretty...” or “very important” to being a doctor. Only 36% of faculty and 41% of trainees had previous business instruction. We identified 434 articles in the systematic review: 29 documented formal business curricula. Twelve topics were addressed with practice management/administration (n=22) and systems-based practice (n=6) being the most common. Four articles were from surgical specialties: otolaryngology (n=1), general surgery (n=2), and combined general surgery/plastic surgery (n=1). Teaching formats included lectures and self-directed learning modules; outcomes and participant satisfaction were inconsistently reported. From August 2013-June 2015, we held eight business principles sessions. Post-session surveys demonstrated moderately-to-extremely satisfied responses in ≥75% of resident/fellow respondents (n=13, response rate=48.1%) and faculty (n=9, response rate=45.0%). DISCUSSION:: Business principles can be integrated into residency training programs. Having speakers familiar with the physician audience and a session coordinator is vital to program success.",
author = "Bahar Zarrabi and Burce, {Karen K.} and Seal, {Stella M.} and Lifchez, {Scott D.} and Redett, {Richard J.} and Kevin Frick and Dorafshar, {Amir H.} and Cooney, {Carisa M.}",
year = "2017",
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journal = "Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery",
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AU - Lifchez,Scott D.

AU - Redett,Richard J.

AU - Frick,Kevin

AU - Dorafshar,Amir H.

AU - Cooney,Carisa M.

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N2 - BACKGROUND:: Rising healthcare costs, decreasing reimbursement rates, and changes in American healthcare are forcing physicians to become increasingly business-minded. Both academic and private plastic surgeons can benefit from being educated in business principles. We conducted a systematic review to identify existing business curricula and integrated a business principles curriculum into residency training. METHODS:: We anonymously surveyed our department regarding perceived importance of business principles and performed a systematic literature review from 1993-2013 using PubMed and Embase to identify residency training programs that had designed/implemented business curricula. Subsequently, we implemented a formal, quarterly business curriculum. RESULTS:: Thirty-two (88.9%) of 36 physicians (76.6% response rate) stated business principles are either “pretty...” or “very important” to being a doctor. Only 36% of faculty and 41% of trainees had previous business instruction. We identified 434 articles in the systematic review: 29 documented formal business curricula. Twelve topics were addressed with practice management/administration (n=22) and systems-based practice (n=6) being the most common. Four articles were from surgical specialties: otolaryngology (n=1), general surgery (n=2), and combined general surgery/plastic surgery (n=1). Teaching formats included lectures and self-directed learning modules; outcomes and participant satisfaction were inconsistently reported. From August 2013-June 2015, we held eight business principles sessions. Post-session surveys demonstrated moderately-to-extremely satisfied responses in ≥75% of resident/fellow respondents (n=13, response rate=48.1%) and faculty (n=9, response rate=45.0%). DISCUSSION:: Business principles can be integrated into residency training programs. Having speakers familiar with the physician audience and a session coordinator is vital to program success.

AB - BACKGROUND:: Rising healthcare costs, decreasing reimbursement rates, and changes in American healthcare are forcing physicians to become increasingly business-minded. Both academic and private plastic surgeons can benefit from being educated in business principles. We conducted a systematic review to identify existing business curricula and integrated a business principles curriculum into residency training. METHODS:: We anonymously surveyed our department regarding perceived importance of business principles and performed a systematic literature review from 1993-2013 using PubMed and Embase to identify residency training programs that had designed/implemented business curricula. Subsequently, we implemented a formal, quarterly business curriculum. RESULTS:: Thirty-two (88.9%) of 36 physicians (76.6% response rate) stated business principles are either “pretty...” or “very important” to being a doctor. Only 36% of faculty and 41% of trainees had previous business instruction. We identified 434 articles in the systematic review: 29 documented formal business curricula. Twelve topics were addressed with practice management/administration (n=22) and systems-based practice (n=6) being the most common. Four articles were from surgical specialties: otolaryngology (n=1), general surgery (n=2), and combined general surgery/plastic surgery (n=1). Teaching formats included lectures and self-directed learning modules; outcomes and participant satisfaction were inconsistently reported. From August 2013-June 2015, we held eight business principles sessions. Post-session surveys demonstrated moderately-to-extremely satisfied responses in ≥75% of resident/fellow respondents (n=13, response rate=48.1%) and faculty (n=9, response rate=45.0%). DISCUSSION:: Business principles can be integrated into residency training programs. Having speakers familiar with the physician audience and a session coordinator is vital to program success.

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