Business and industrial development on American Indian reservations

Alan L. Sorkin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to describe the recent growth of manufacturing enterprises on Indian reservations. After presenting some statistical information regarding the number of firms operating on reservations and the size of their labor forces, the discussion shifts to some of the factors which are inhibiting further Indian industrial development. Such factors as transportation difficulties, lack of nearby markets, and the quality of human resources are considered. However, consideration is also given to the advantages of a reservation location such as low labor costs, abundant natural resources and access to BIA training subsidies. A number of policy alternatives to speed Indian industrial development are discussed. However, unless large expenditures for social overhead capital are made progress will continue to be limited.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)115-129
Number of pages15
JournalThe Annals of Regional Science
Volume7
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1973

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business development
industrial development
American Indian
labor costs
human resource
labor force
human resources
subsidy
expenditure
natural resources
manufacturing
expenditures
natural resource
labor
firm
market
lack
cost
labour force
speed

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Science (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Business and industrial development on American Indian reservations. / Sorkin, Alan L.

In: The Annals of Regional Science, Vol. 7, No. 2, 12.1973, p. 115-129.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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