Burns in Sierra Leone: A population-based assessment

Evan Wong, Reinou S. Groen, Thaim B. Kamara, Kerry-Ann Mitchell, Laura D. Cassidy, Mohamed Samai, Adam L. Kushner, Sherry M. Wren

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: Burns remain disproportionately prevalent in developing countries. This study aims to describe the epidemiology of burns in Sierra Leone to serve as a baseline for future programs. Methods: A cluster randomized, cross-sectional, countrywide survey was conducted in 2012 in Sierra Leone. With a standardized questionnaire demographics and deaths during the previous 12 months of household members were assessed with the household representative. Thereafter, 2 randomly selected household members were interviewed, elucidating whether participants had ever had a burn in six body regions and determining burn mechanisms and patterns of health care seeking behavior. Results: This study included 1843 households and 3645 individuals. 3.98% (145/3645) of individuals reported at least one burn-injury. The highest proportions of burns were reported in the age groups 0-4 years old (23/426, 5.4%) and 5-14 years old (37/887, 4.17%). The majority of burns (129/145, 89.0%) were caused by a hot liquid/object and the upper, extremities were the most commonly burned body regions, with 36% (53/145) of cases. 21% (30/145) of individuals with burns sought care from a traditional healer. Conclusions: Burns are highly prevalent in Sierra Leone. Further research and resources should be allocated to the care and prevention of thermal injuries.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1748-1753
Number of pages6
JournalBurns
Volume40
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

Fingerprint

Sierra Leone
Burns
Population
Body Regions
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Wounds and Injuries
Upper Extremity
Developing Countries
Epidemiology
Age Groups
Cross-Sectional Studies
Hot Temperature
Demography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Emergency Medicine
  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

Cite this

Wong, E., Groen, R. S., Kamara, T. B., Mitchell, K-A., Cassidy, L. D., Samai, M., ... Wren, S. M. (2014). Burns in Sierra Leone: A population-based assessment. Burns, 40(8), 1748-1753. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.burns.2014.03.007

Burns in Sierra Leone : A population-based assessment. / Wong, Evan; Groen, Reinou S.; Kamara, Thaim B.; Mitchell, Kerry-Ann; Cassidy, Laura D.; Samai, Mohamed; Kushner, Adam L.; Wren, Sherry M.

In: Burns, Vol. 40, No. 8, 01.01.2014, p. 1748-1753.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wong, E, Groen, RS, Kamara, TB, Mitchell, K-A, Cassidy, LD, Samai, M, Kushner, AL & Wren, SM 2014, 'Burns in Sierra Leone: A population-based assessment', Burns, vol. 40, no. 8, pp. 1748-1753. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.burns.2014.03.007
Wong E, Groen RS, Kamara TB, Mitchell K-A, Cassidy LD, Samai M et al. Burns in Sierra Leone: A population-based assessment. Burns. 2014 Jan 1;40(8):1748-1753. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.burns.2014.03.007
Wong, Evan ; Groen, Reinou S. ; Kamara, Thaim B. ; Mitchell, Kerry-Ann ; Cassidy, Laura D. ; Samai, Mohamed ; Kushner, Adam L. ; Wren, Sherry M. / Burns in Sierra Leone : A population-based assessment. In: Burns. 2014 ; Vol. 40, No. 8. pp. 1748-1753.
@article{e2257134a0af49a0b3123a6cf159df4e,
title = "Burns in Sierra Leone: A population-based assessment",
abstract = "Purpose: Burns remain disproportionately prevalent in developing countries. This study aims to describe the epidemiology of burns in Sierra Leone to serve as a baseline for future programs. Methods: A cluster randomized, cross-sectional, countrywide survey was conducted in 2012 in Sierra Leone. With a standardized questionnaire demographics and deaths during the previous 12 months of household members were assessed with the household representative. Thereafter, 2 randomly selected household members were interviewed, elucidating whether participants had ever had a burn in six body regions and determining burn mechanisms and patterns of health care seeking behavior. Results: This study included 1843 households and 3645 individuals. 3.98{\%} (145/3645) of individuals reported at least one burn-injury. The highest proportions of burns were reported in the age groups 0-4 years old (23/426, 5.4{\%}) and 5-14 years old (37/887, 4.17{\%}). The majority of burns (129/145, 89.0{\%}) were caused by a hot liquid/object and the upper, extremities were the most commonly burned body regions, with 36{\%} (53/145) of cases. 21{\%} (30/145) of individuals with burns sought care from a traditional healer. Conclusions: Burns are highly prevalent in Sierra Leone. Further research and resources should be allocated to the care and prevention of thermal injuries.",
author = "Evan Wong and Groen, {Reinou S.} and Kamara, {Thaim B.} and Kerry-Ann Mitchell and Cassidy, {Laura D.} and Mohamed Samai and Kushner, {Adam L.} and Wren, {Sherry M.}",
year = "2014",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.burns.2014.03.007",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "40",
pages = "1748--1753",
journal = "Burns",
issn = "0305-4179",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",
number = "8",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Burns in Sierra Leone

T2 - A population-based assessment

AU - Wong, Evan

AU - Groen, Reinou S.

AU - Kamara, Thaim B.

AU - Mitchell, Kerry-Ann

AU - Cassidy, Laura D.

AU - Samai, Mohamed

AU - Kushner, Adam L.

AU - Wren, Sherry M.

PY - 2014/1/1

Y1 - 2014/1/1

N2 - Purpose: Burns remain disproportionately prevalent in developing countries. This study aims to describe the epidemiology of burns in Sierra Leone to serve as a baseline for future programs. Methods: A cluster randomized, cross-sectional, countrywide survey was conducted in 2012 in Sierra Leone. With a standardized questionnaire demographics and deaths during the previous 12 months of household members were assessed with the household representative. Thereafter, 2 randomly selected household members were interviewed, elucidating whether participants had ever had a burn in six body regions and determining burn mechanisms and patterns of health care seeking behavior. Results: This study included 1843 households and 3645 individuals. 3.98% (145/3645) of individuals reported at least one burn-injury. The highest proportions of burns were reported in the age groups 0-4 years old (23/426, 5.4%) and 5-14 years old (37/887, 4.17%). The majority of burns (129/145, 89.0%) were caused by a hot liquid/object and the upper, extremities were the most commonly burned body regions, with 36% (53/145) of cases. 21% (30/145) of individuals with burns sought care from a traditional healer. Conclusions: Burns are highly prevalent in Sierra Leone. Further research and resources should be allocated to the care and prevention of thermal injuries.

AB - Purpose: Burns remain disproportionately prevalent in developing countries. This study aims to describe the epidemiology of burns in Sierra Leone to serve as a baseline for future programs. Methods: A cluster randomized, cross-sectional, countrywide survey was conducted in 2012 in Sierra Leone. With a standardized questionnaire demographics and deaths during the previous 12 months of household members were assessed with the household representative. Thereafter, 2 randomly selected household members were interviewed, elucidating whether participants had ever had a burn in six body regions and determining burn mechanisms and patterns of health care seeking behavior. Results: This study included 1843 households and 3645 individuals. 3.98% (145/3645) of individuals reported at least one burn-injury. The highest proportions of burns were reported in the age groups 0-4 years old (23/426, 5.4%) and 5-14 years old (37/887, 4.17%). The majority of burns (129/145, 89.0%) were caused by a hot liquid/object and the upper, extremities were the most commonly burned body regions, with 36% (53/145) of cases. 21% (30/145) of individuals with burns sought care from a traditional healer. Conclusions: Burns are highly prevalent in Sierra Leone. Further research and resources should be allocated to the care and prevention of thermal injuries.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84922059690&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84922059690&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.burns.2014.03.007

DO - 10.1016/j.burns.2014.03.007

M3 - Article

C2 - 24767716

AN - SCOPUS:84922059690

VL - 40

SP - 1748

EP - 1753

JO - Burns

JF - Burns

SN - 0305-4179

IS - 8

ER -