Burkitt’S Lymphoma In The Mengo Districts Of Uganda: Epidemiologic Features And Their Relationship To Malaria

R. H. Morrow, A. Kisuule, M. C. Pike, P. G. Smith

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

An epidemiologic study of 123 patients residing in the Mengo Districts of Uganda, with onset of symptoms of diagnosed Burkitt’s lymphoma (BL) in the period 1959–68, revealed a substantial decline in incidence of BL during that decade. Other significant findings included differences by ethnic group in age of patient at onset of BL, a change in the proportions of patients by ethnic group over the decade, a lower incidence rate of BL in the counties of higher altitude, and a seasonal pattern of onset. There was no evidence of the time-space clustering previously reported for BL in Uganda. The changing pattern of BL in the Mengo Districts was consistent with the hypothesis that severe malaria infection not only is important in the development of BL but also precipitates onset.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)479-483
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of the National Cancer Institute
Volume56
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1976

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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