Burden of peripheral artery disease on mortality and incident cardiovascular events

Jonathan T. Unkart, Matthew A. Allison, Maria Rosario G. Araneta, Joachim H. Ix, Kunihiro Matsushita, Michael H. Criqui

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Using data from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (United States, 2000-2015), 6,527 racially/ethnically diverse adults (mean age, 62 (standard deviation, 10) years) free of known cardiovascular (CVD) had ankle brachial index (ABI) assessment of their bilateral dorsalis pedis/posterior tibial arteries (4 vessels total) and were followed for total mortality and incident CVD events/mortality. Individuals were classified into categories of 0-, 1-, 2-, 3- or 4-vessel peripheral artery disease (PAD) (ABI of ≤0.9). There were 1,202 deaths (18%), 656 incident CVD events (10%), and 282 CVD deaths (4.3%). Of the 6,527 individuals, 5,711 (87.5%) had 0-, 460 (7.0%) had 1-, 218 (3.3%) had 2-, 69 (1.1%) had 3-, and 69 (1.1%) had 4-vessel PAD, respectively. In multivariable Cox models, higher number of vessels with PAD was associated with higher risk of mortality (P for trend <0.001), CVD events (P for trend = 0.002), and CVD mortality (P for trend = 0.001). Compared with individuals who had 0-vessel disease, hazard ratios for mortality were 1.29 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.06, 1.59) for 1-, 1.45 (95% CI: 1.14, 1.86) for 2-, 1.58 (95% CI: 1.13, 2.21) for 3-, and 2.15 (95% CI: 1.58, 2.94) for 4-vessel disease. A similar pattern was seen for CVD events/mortality. These results suggest the importance of accounting for ABI values of all 4 leg arteries in clinical practice and research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)951-962
Number of pages12
JournalAmerican journal of epidemiology
Volume189
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2020

Keywords

  • Ankle brachial index
  • Claudication
  • Multivessel
  • Primary prevention
  • Screening

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology

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