Bullying Prevention

a Summary of the Report of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine: Committee on the Biological and Psychosocial Effects of Peer Victimization: Lessons for Bullying Prevention

Daniel J. Flannery, Jonathan Todres, Catherine P. Bradshaw, Angela Frederick Amar, Sandra Graham, Mark Hatzenbuehler, Matthew Masiello, Megan Moreno, Regina Sullivan, Tracy Vaillancourt, Suzanne M. Le Menestrel, Frederick Rivara

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Long tolerated as a rite of passage into adulthood, bullying is now recognized as a major and preventable public health problem. The consequences of bullying—for those who are bullied, the perpetrators of bullying, and the witnesses—include poor physical health, anxiety, depression, increased risk for suicide, poor school performance, and future delinquent and aggressive behavior. Despite ongoing efforts to address bullying at the law, policy, and programmatic levels, there is still much to learn about the consequences of bullying and the effectiveness of various responses. In 2016, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine published a report entitled Preventing Bullying Through Science, Policy and Practice, which examined the evidence on bullying, its impact, and responses to date. This article summarizes the report’s key findings and recommendations related to bullying prevention.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1044-1053
Number of pages10
JournalPrevention Science
Volume17
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2016
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Bullying
Crime Victims
Medicine
Suicide
Anxiety
Public Health
Depression
Health

Keywords

  • Bullying
  • Peer victimization
  • Prevention

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Bullying Prevention : a Summary of the Report of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine: Committee on the Biological and Psychosocial Effects of Peer Victimization: Lessons for Bullying Prevention. / Flannery, Daniel J.; Todres, Jonathan; Bradshaw, Catherine P.; Amar, Angela Frederick; Graham, Sandra; Hatzenbuehler, Mark; Masiello, Matthew; Moreno, Megan; Sullivan, Regina; Vaillancourt, Tracy; Le Menestrel, Suzanne M.; Rivara, Frederick.

In: Prevention Science, Vol. 17, No. 8, 01.11.2016, p. 1044-1053.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Flannery, DJ, Todres, J, Bradshaw, CP, Amar, AF, Graham, S, Hatzenbuehler, M, Masiello, M, Moreno, M, Sullivan, R, Vaillancourt, T, Le Menestrel, SM & Rivara, F 2016, 'Bullying Prevention: a Summary of the Report of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine: Committee on the Biological and Psychosocial Effects of Peer Victimization: Lessons for Bullying Prevention', Prevention Science, vol. 17, no. 8, pp. 1044-1053. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11121-016-0722-8
Flannery, Daniel J. ; Todres, Jonathan ; Bradshaw, Catherine P. ; Amar, Angela Frederick ; Graham, Sandra ; Hatzenbuehler, Mark ; Masiello, Matthew ; Moreno, Megan ; Sullivan, Regina ; Vaillancourt, Tracy ; Le Menestrel, Suzanne M. ; Rivara, Frederick. / Bullying Prevention : a Summary of the Report of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine: Committee on the Biological and Psychosocial Effects of Peer Victimization: Lessons for Bullying Prevention. In: Prevention Science. 2016 ; Vol. 17, No. 8. pp. 1044-1053.
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