Bubble continuous positive airway pressure in a human immunodeficiency virus-infected infant

Eric McCollum, A. Smith, C. L. Golitko

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

World Health Organization-classified very severe pneumonia due to Pneumocystis jirovecii infection is recognized as a life-threatening condition in human immunodefi ciency virus (HIV) infected infants. We recount the use of nasal bubble continuous positive airway pressure (BCPAP) in an HIV-infected African infant with very severe pneumonia and treatment failure due to suspected infection with P. jirovecii. We also examine the potential implications of BCPAP use in resource-poor settings with a high case index of acute respiratory failure due to HIV-related pneumonia, but limited access to mechanical ventilation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)562-564
Number of pages3
JournalInternational Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease
Volume15
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2011
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Continuous Positive Airway Pressure
Pneumocystis carinii
Pneumonia
HIV
Viruses
Pneumocystis Infections
Treatment Failure
Artificial Respiration
Respiratory Insufficiency
Infection

Keywords

  • BCPAP
  • Early infant diagnosis
  • HIV
  • Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia
  • Sub-Saharan Africa

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Bubble continuous positive airway pressure in a human immunodeficiency virus-infected infant. / McCollum, Eric; Smith, A.; Golitko, C. L.

In: International Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, Vol. 15, No. 4, 04.2011, p. 562-564.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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