Broad human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-specific T cell responses to conserved HIV proteins in HIV-seronegative women highly exposed to a single HIV-infected partner

Nattawan Promadej, Caroline Costello, Mary M. Wernett, Prasad S. Kulkarni, Valerie A. Robison, Kenrad E. Nelson, Thomas W. Hodge, Vinai Suriyanon, Ann Duerr, Janet M. McNicholl

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Eighteen highly exposed but persistently seronegative (HEPS) women (HW) and their human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1-seropositive male partners were studied for HIV-specific T cells and other host factors. Circulating HIV-specific T cells were measured by interferon-γ enzyme-linked immunospot assays, using recombinant vaccinia virus vectors expressing HIV proteins. Nine (50%) of the HW and all HIV-seropositive persons had HIV-specific T cell responses. Only 2 (22%) of the HEPS responders recognized Env, compared with 94% of HIV-seropositive persons. A high percentage (75%) of the HW with HIV-specific T cell responses reported recent HIV exposure. Remarkably, however, long-lived HIV-specific T cells were detected in 2 HW who had an extended period (>3.9 years) of no HIV exposure. These findings have important implications for HIV vaccine design.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1053-1063
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
Volume187
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2003

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Infectious Diseases

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