Brief Report

Texas School District Autism Prevalence in Children from Non-English-Speaking Homes

Aisha Dickerson, Asha S. Dickerson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Previous studies have implicated migration and ethnicity as possible risk factors for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in developed countries. Using Texas education data, we calculated district-reported ASD prevalence stratified by geographic region, with reported home language as a proxy for immigration. Prevalence ratios were also stratified by race. Prevalence estimates were significantly lower for White children from homes speaking Spanish and other non-English languages compared to those from English-speaking homes. This is the first study, to our knowledge, that investigates ASD prevalence of children from non-English-speaking households in a large sample. Barriers in identification of children of immigrants with ASD indicate that the increased district-reported prevalence seen in our study may only be a small indicator of a potentially larger prevalence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-7
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jul 4 2018
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Autistic Disorder
Language
Emigration and Immigration
Proxy
Developed Countries
Education
Autism Spectrum Disorder

Keywords

  • Autism spectrum disorder
  • Cultural competence
  • Immigration
  • Language proficiency
  • Special education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

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