Bridging the Housing and Health Policy Divide: Lessons in Community Development From Memphis and Baltimore

Christina Plerhoples Stacy, Joseph Schilling, Ruth Gourevitch, Jacob Lowy, Brady Meixell, Rachel Johnson Thornton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Governments and nonprofits routinely partner to launch place-based initiatives in distressed neighborhoods with the goal of stabilizing real estate markets, reclaiming vacant properties, abating public nuisances, and reducing crime. Public health impacts and outcomes are rarely the major policy drivers in the design and implementation of these neighborhood-scale initiatives. In this article, we examine recent health impact assessments in Baltimore, Maryland, and Memphis, Tennessee, to show how public health concepts, principles, and practices can be infused into existing and new programs and policies, and how public health programs can help to improve population health by addressing the upstream social determinants of health. We provide a portfolio of ideas and practices to bridge this classic divide of housing and health policy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalHousing Policy Debate
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2019

Keywords

  • community development
  • housing
  • neighborhood revitalization
  • Public health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Development
  • Urban Studies
  • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Bridging the Housing and Health Policy Divide: Lessons in Community Development From Memphis and Baltimore'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this