Bridging neurocognitive aging and disease modification

Targeting functional mechanisms of memory impairment

Michela Gallagher, Arnold Bakker, M. A. Yassa, C. E L Stark

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Risk for Alzheimer's disease escalates dramatically with increasing age in the later decades of life. It is widely recognized that a preclinical condition in which memory loss is greater than would be expected for a person's age, referred to as amnestic mild cognitive impairment, may offer the best opportunity for intervention to treat symptoms and modify disease progression. Here we discuss a basis for age-related memory impairment, first discovered in animal models and recently isolated in the medial temporal lobe system of man, that offers a novel entry point for restoring memory function with the possible benefit in slowing progression to Alzheimer's disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)197-199
Number of pages3
JournalCurrent Alzheimer Research
Volume7
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2010

Fingerprint

Alzheimer Disease
Memory Disorders
Temporal Lobe
Disease Progression
Animal Models
Cognitive Dysfunction

Keywords

  • Animal models
  • Dentate gyrus/CA3
  • Hippocampus
  • Memory
  • Mild cognitive impairment
  • Neuroimaging
  • Pattern completion
  • Pattern separation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Bridging neurocognitive aging and disease modification : Targeting functional mechanisms of memory impairment. / Gallagher, Michela; Bakker, Arnold; Yassa, M. A.; Stark, C. E L.

In: Current Alzheimer Research, Vol. 7, No. 3, 05.2010, p. 197-199.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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