Breast reconstruction in the elderly: Preserving excellent quality of life

John A. Girotto, Jeffrey Schreiber, Maurice Y. Nahabedian, Paul Glat

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

There is a paucity of information in the literature that focuses on quality-of-life issues after mastectomy with breast reconstruction in elderly women. The purpose of this study was to review the authors' experience with breast reconstruction after mastectomy in women older than 65 years of age. Emphasis was placed on the types of reconstructions, outcomes, and evaluation of issues related to quality of life. Between July 1997 and July 2001, 316 consecutive women (400 reconstructions) with breast cancer underwent mastectomy with reconstruction at the authors' institution. Of these women, 24 (28 reconstructions) were at least 65 years old. Mean patient age was 69.3 years (range, 65-77 years). Methods of breast reconstruction included two-stage implant reconstruction (50%), free tissue transfer (transverse rectus abdominis musculocutaneous or deep inferior epigastric perforator flap, 25%), pedicle transverse rectus abdominis musculocutaneous flap (14%), or a latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous flap (11%). Outcomes were assessed with the use of a self-reported questionnaire (SF-36) addressing health-related quality of life, body image, and physical functioning. With respect to overall quality-of-life issues after reconstruction, older patients with breast reconstruction scored higher (better outcomes) than age-matched general population patients and previously reported mastectomy-only patients (>55 years) in all surveyed areas. Specifically, study patients reported dramatic increases (better outcomes) in the subscales that are strongly influenced by one's mental health. However, when compared with prior data for younger patients undergoing mastectomy and reconstruction, the older patients scored lower (worse outcomes) in the areas related to physical function. The older patients maintained superior scores (better outcomes) over the younger patients in the subscales influenced by one's mental health.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)572-578
Number of pages7
JournalAnnals of Plastic Surgery
Volume50
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2003
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Mammaplasty
Quality of Life
Mastectomy
Rectus Abdominis
Myocutaneous Flap
Mental Health
Perforator Flap
Superficial Back Muscles
Body Image
Breast Neoplasms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Breast reconstruction in the elderly : Preserving excellent quality of life. / Girotto, John A.; Schreiber, Jeffrey; Nahabedian, Maurice Y.; Glat, Paul.

In: Annals of Plastic Surgery, Vol. 50, No. 6, 01.06.2003, p. 572-578.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Girotto, John A. ; Schreiber, Jeffrey ; Nahabedian, Maurice Y. ; Glat, Paul. / Breast reconstruction in the elderly : Preserving excellent quality of life. In: Annals of Plastic Surgery. 2003 ; Vol. 50, No. 6. pp. 572-578.
@article{36fef9e500334847a433c0995757050e,
title = "Breast reconstruction in the elderly: Preserving excellent quality of life",
abstract = "There is a paucity of information in the literature that focuses on quality-of-life issues after mastectomy with breast reconstruction in elderly women. The purpose of this study was to review the authors' experience with breast reconstruction after mastectomy in women older than 65 years of age. Emphasis was placed on the types of reconstructions, outcomes, and evaluation of issues related to quality of life. Between July 1997 and July 2001, 316 consecutive women (400 reconstructions) with breast cancer underwent mastectomy with reconstruction at the authors' institution. Of these women, 24 (28 reconstructions) were at least 65 years old. Mean patient age was 69.3 years (range, 65-77 years). Methods of breast reconstruction included two-stage implant reconstruction (50{\%}), free tissue transfer (transverse rectus abdominis musculocutaneous or deep inferior epigastric perforator flap, 25{\%}), pedicle transverse rectus abdominis musculocutaneous flap (14{\%}), or a latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous flap (11{\%}). Outcomes were assessed with the use of a self-reported questionnaire (SF-36) addressing health-related quality of life, body image, and physical functioning. With respect to overall quality-of-life issues after reconstruction, older patients with breast reconstruction scored higher (better outcomes) than age-matched general population patients and previously reported mastectomy-only patients (>55 years) in all surveyed areas. Specifically, study patients reported dramatic increases (better outcomes) in the subscales that are strongly influenced by one's mental health. However, when compared with prior data for younger patients undergoing mastectomy and reconstruction, the older patients scored lower (worse outcomes) in the areas related to physical function. The older patients maintained superior scores (better outcomes) over the younger patients in the subscales influenced by one's mental health.",
author = "Girotto, {John A.} and Jeffrey Schreiber and Nahabedian, {Maurice Y.} and Paul Glat",
year = "2003",
month = "6",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1097/01.SAP.0000069064.68579.19",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "50",
pages = "572--578",
journal = "Annals of Plastic Surgery",
issn = "0148-7043",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Breast reconstruction in the elderly

T2 - Preserving excellent quality of life

AU - Girotto, John A.

AU - Schreiber, Jeffrey

AU - Nahabedian, Maurice Y.

AU - Glat, Paul

PY - 2003/6/1

Y1 - 2003/6/1

N2 - There is a paucity of information in the literature that focuses on quality-of-life issues after mastectomy with breast reconstruction in elderly women. The purpose of this study was to review the authors' experience with breast reconstruction after mastectomy in women older than 65 years of age. Emphasis was placed on the types of reconstructions, outcomes, and evaluation of issues related to quality of life. Between July 1997 and July 2001, 316 consecutive women (400 reconstructions) with breast cancer underwent mastectomy with reconstruction at the authors' institution. Of these women, 24 (28 reconstructions) were at least 65 years old. Mean patient age was 69.3 years (range, 65-77 years). Methods of breast reconstruction included two-stage implant reconstruction (50%), free tissue transfer (transverse rectus abdominis musculocutaneous or deep inferior epigastric perforator flap, 25%), pedicle transverse rectus abdominis musculocutaneous flap (14%), or a latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous flap (11%). Outcomes were assessed with the use of a self-reported questionnaire (SF-36) addressing health-related quality of life, body image, and physical functioning. With respect to overall quality-of-life issues after reconstruction, older patients with breast reconstruction scored higher (better outcomes) than age-matched general population patients and previously reported mastectomy-only patients (>55 years) in all surveyed areas. Specifically, study patients reported dramatic increases (better outcomes) in the subscales that are strongly influenced by one's mental health. However, when compared with prior data for younger patients undergoing mastectomy and reconstruction, the older patients scored lower (worse outcomes) in the areas related to physical function. The older patients maintained superior scores (better outcomes) over the younger patients in the subscales influenced by one's mental health.

AB - There is a paucity of information in the literature that focuses on quality-of-life issues after mastectomy with breast reconstruction in elderly women. The purpose of this study was to review the authors' experience with breast reconstruction after mastectomy in women older than 65 years of age. Emphasis was placed on the types of reconstructions, outcomes, and evaluation of issues related to quality of life. Between July 1997 and July 2001, 316 consecutive women (400 reconstructions) with breast cancer underwent mastectomy with reconstruction at the authors' institution. Of these women, 24 (28 reconstructions) were at least 65 years old. Mean patient age was 69.3 years (range, 65-77 years). Methods of breast reconstruction included two-stage implant reconstruction (50%), free tissue transfer (transverse rectus abdominis musculocutaneous or deep inferior epigastric perforator flap, 25%), pedicle transverse rectus abdominis musculocutaneous flap (14%), or a latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous flap (11%). Outcomes were assessed with the use of a self-reported questionnaire (SF-36) addressing health-related quality of life, body image, and physical functioning. With respect to overall quality-of-life issues after reconstruction, older patients with breast reconstruction scored higher (better outcomes) than age-matched general population patients and previously reported mastectomy-only patients (>55 years) in all surveyed areas. Specifically, study patients reported dramatic increases (better outcomes) in the subscales that are strongly influenced by one's mental health. However, when compared with prior data for younger patients undergoing mastectomy and reconstruction, the older patients scored lower (worse outcomes) in the areas related to physical function. The older patients maintained superior scores (better outcomes) over the younger patients in the subscales influenced by one's mental health.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0037945373&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0037945373&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/01.SAP.0000069064.68579.19

DO - 10.1097/01.SAP.0000069064.68579.19

M3 - Article

C2 - 12783001

AN - SCOPUS:0037945373

VL - 50

SP - 572

EP - 578

JO - Annals of Plastic Surgery

JF - Annals of Plastic Surgery

SN - 0148-7043

IS - 6

ER -