Breast reconstruction: Current and future options

Henry Paul, Tahira I. Prendergast, Bryson Nicholson, Shenita White, Wayne A I Frederick

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

When initiated by the devastating diagnosis of cancer, post ablative breast restoration has at its core the goal of restoring anatomic normalcy. The concepts of body image, wholeness, and overall well-being have been introduced to explain the paramount psychological influence the breast has on both individuals and society as a whole. Hence, a growing subspecialty has been established to recreate or simulate the lost breast. At least one third of breast cancer victims consider breast reconstruction. Breast reconstruction post mastectomy may be offered at the time of mastectomy or delayed post mastectomy after adjuvant therapy. This may be utilizing autologous tissues or implants and each has risks and benefits, especially when considering adjuvant therapy. In addition, there has been a move away from a traditional mastectomy to less invasive, but still curative procedures, such as skin-sparing and nipple-sparing mastectomy. These procedures provide the breast envelope to facilitate reconstruction. This paper reviews the primary issues in breast reconstruction, as well as their psychologic, oncologic, and social impact.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)93-99
Number of pages7
JournalBreast Cancer: Targets and Therapy
Volume3
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 16 2011
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Mammaplasty
Mastectomy
Breast
Nipples
Body Image
Social Change
Breast Neoplasms
Psychology
Skin
Therapeutics
Neoplasms

Keywords

  • Body image
  • Breast reconstruction
  • Breast restoration
  • Mastectomy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology

Cite this

Paul, H., Prendergast, T. I., Nicholson, B., White, S., & Frederick, W. A. I. (2011). Breast reconstruction: Current and future options. Breast Cancer: Targets and Therapy, 3, 93-99. https://doi.org/10.2147/BCTT.S13418

Breast reconstruction : Current and future options. / Paul, Henry; Prendergast, Tahira I.; Nicholson, Bryson; White, Shenita; Frederick, Wayne A I.

In: Breast Cancer: Targets and Therapy, Vol. 3, 16.08.2011, p. 93-99.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Paul, H, Prendergast, TI, Nicholson, B, White, S & Frederick, WAI 2011, 'Breast reconstruction: Current and future options', Breast Cancer: Targets and Therapy, vol. 3, pp. 93-99. https://doi.org/10.2147/BCTT.S13418
Paul H, Prendergast TI, Nicholson B, White S, Frederick WAI. Breast reconstruction: Current and future options. Breast Cancer: Targets and Therapy. 2011 Aug 16;3:93-99. https://doi.org/10.2147/BCTT.S13418
Paul, Henry ; Prendergast, Tahira I. ; Nicholson, Bryson ; White, Shenita ; Frederick, Wayne A I. / Breast reconstruction : Current and future options. In: Breast Cancer: Targets and Therapy. 2011 ; Vol. 3. pp. 93-99.
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