Breast milk retinol concentrations are not associated with systemic inflammation among breast-feeding women in Malawi

Barbara Dancheck, Veronique Nussenblatt, Michelle O. Ricks, Newton Kumwenda, Margaret C. Neville, Dana T. Moncrief, Taha E. Taha, Richard D. Semba

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The acute phase response and inflammation are associated with lower plasma retinol concentrations, but their effect on breast milk retinol concentrations is unclear. We measured plasma retinol concentrations, acute phase proteins, and breast milk retinol concentrations in 237 breast-feeding women at 2 wk postpartum in Blantyre, Malawi; 16.5% of the women had plasma retinol < 0.70 μmol/L. and 14.8% had breast milk retinol < 1.05 μmol/L. Among women with and without inflammation [α1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) > 1 g/L and/or C-reactive protein (CRP) > 5 mg/L], geometric mean (95% Cl) plasma retinol was 0.89 (0.84, 0.94) and 1.05 (1.01, 1.17) μmol/L, respectively (P < 0.0001). Among women with and without inflammation, geometric mean (95% Cl) breast milk retinol was 2.12 (1.89, 2.36) and 2.05 (1.75, 2.39) μmol/L, respectively (P = 0.74). In multiple linear regression models adjusting for age, parity, education, BMI, and days postpartum, plasma retinol concentrations were associated with plasma AGP and CRP concentrations (P < 0.0001 and P = 0.01, respectively), whereas breast milk retinol concentrations were unaffected by plasma AGP and CRP concentrations (P = 0.22 and P = 0.86, respectively). These findings suggest that breast milk retinol concentrations are not affected by systemic inflammation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)223-226
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Nutrition
Volume135
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2005

Keywords

  • Acute phase response
  • Inflammation
  • Milk
  • Retinol
  • Vitamin A deficiency

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Breast milk retinol concentrations are not associated with systemic inflammation among breast-feeding women in Malawi'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this