Breast and cervical cancer screening: Sociodemographic predictors among White, Black, and Hispanic women

Elizabeth Selvin, Kate M. Brett

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objectives. We evaluated the relationship between breast and cervical cancer screening and a variety of variables across race/ethnicity groups. Methods. Using logistic regression models, we analyzed data from the 1998 National Health Interview Survey to assess the relative importance of the independent variables in predicting use of cancer screening services. Results. Having a usual source of care was the most important predictor of cancer screening use for all race/ethnicity groups. Health insurance was associated with an increased likelihood of cancer screening. Smoking was associated with a decreased likelihood of cancer screening. Conclusions. Regardless of race/ethnicity, most women follow mammography and cervical cancer screening guidelines. The identification of specific factors associated with adherence to cancer screening guidelines may help inform screening campaigns.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)618-623
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican journal of public health
Volume93
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2003

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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