Brain Protection in Cardiac Surgery

Kelly Grogan, Joshua Stearns, Charles W. Hogue

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Brain injury is a major source of patient morbidity after cardiac surgery, and is associated with prolonged hospitalization, excessive operative mortality, high hospital costs, and altered quality of life. Frequency and the clinical manifestations depend on multiple factors, including the completeness and timing of neurologic testing. Ischemic brain infarctions may or may not be associated with stroke or postoperative neurocognitive dysfunction, but the long-term implications of these lesions on neurologic function have not yet been extensively evaluated. This article reviews the current views on the pathophysiologic basis of cerebral injury after cardiac surgery and provides a summary of measures aimed at reducing its occurrence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)521-538
Number of pages18
JournalAnesthesiology Clinics
Volume26
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2008

Fingerprint

Nervous System
Thoracic Surgery
Brain Infarction
Hospital Costs
Brain
Brain Injuries
Hospitalization
Stroke
Quality of Life
Morbidity
Mortality
Wounds and Injuries

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

Cite this

Grogan, K., Stearns, J., & Hogue, C. W. (2008). Brain Protection in Cardiac Surgery. Anesthesiology Clinics, 26(3), 521-538. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.anclin.2008.03.003

Brain Protection in Cardiac Surgery. / Grogan, Kelly; Stearns, Joshua; Hogue, Charles W.

In: Anesthesiology Clinics, Vol. 26, No. 3, 09.2008, p. 521-538.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Grogan, K, Stearns, J & Hogue, CW 2008, 'Brain Protection in Cardiac Surgery', Anesthesiology Clinics, vol. 26, no. 3, pp. 521-538. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.anclin.2008.03.003
Grogan, Kelly ; Stearns, Joshua ; Hogue, Charles W. / Brain Protection in Cardiac Surgery. In: Anesthesiology Clinics. 2008 ; Vol. 26, No. 3. pp. 521-538.
@article{a01dcb1eb3d74474839758ccd5e48e3c,
title = "Brain Protection in Cardiac Surgery",
abstract = "Brain injury is a major source of patient morbidity after cardiac surgery, and is associated with prolonged hospitalization, excessive operative mortality, high hospital costs, and altered quality of life. Frequency and the clinical manifestations depend on multiple factors, including the completeness and timing of neurologic testing. Ischemic brain infarctions may or may not be associated with stroke or postoperative neurocognitive dysfunction, but the long-term implications of these lesions on neurologic function have not yet been extensively evaluated. This article reviews the current views on the pathophysiologic basis of cerebral injury after cardiac surgery and provides a summary of measures aimed at reducing its occurrence.",
author = "Kelly Grogan and Joshua Stearns and Hogue, {Charles W.}",
year = "2008",
month = "9",
doi = "10.1016/j.anclin.2008.03.003",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "26",
pages = "521--538",
journal = "Anesthesiology Clinics",
issn = "1932-2275",
publisher = "W.B. Saunders Ltd",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Brain Protection in Cardiac Surgery

AU - Grogan, Kelly

AU - Stearns, Joshua

AU - Hogue, Charles W.

PY - 2008/9

Y1 - 2008/9

N2 - Brain injury is a major source of patient morbidity after cardiac surgery, and is associated with prolonged hospitalization, excessive operative mortality, high hospital costs, and altered quality of life. Frequency and the clinical manifestations depend on multiple factors, including the completeness and timing of neurologic testing. Ischemic brain infarctions may or may not be associated with stroke or postoperative neurocognitive dysfunction, but the long-term implications of these lesions on neurologic function have not yet been extensively evaluated. This article reviews the current views on the pathophysiologic basis of cerebral injury after cardiac surgery and provides a summary of measures aimed at reducing its occurrence.

AB - Brain injury is a major source of patient morbidity after cardiac surgery, and is associated with prolonged hospitalization, excessive operative mortality, high hospital costs, and altered quality of life. Frequency and the clinical manifestations depend on multiple factors, including the completeness and timing of neurologic testing. Ischemic brain infarctions may or may not be associated with stroke or postoperative neurocognitive dysfunction, but the long-term implications of these lesions on neurologic function have not yet been extensively evaluated. This article reviews the current views on the pathophysiologic basis of cerebral injury after cardiac surgery and provides a summary of measures aimed at reducing its occurrence.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=50349089715&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=50349089715&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.anclin.2008.03.003

DO - 10.1016/j.anclin.2008.03.003

M3 - Article

VL - 26

SP - 521

EP - 538

JO - Anesthesiology Clinics

JF - Anesthesiology Clinics

SN - 1932-2275

IS - 3

ER -