Brain microvascular function during cardiopulmonary bypass

H. R. Sorensen, B. Husum, J. Waaben, K. Andersen, L. I. Andersen, K. Gefke, A. L. Kaarsen, A. Gjedde

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Emboli in the brain microvasculature may inhibit brain activity during cardiopulmonary bypass. Such hypothetical blockade, if confirmed, may be responsible for the reduction of cerebral metabolic rate for glucose observed in animals subjected to cardiopulmonary bypass. In previous studies of cerebral blood flow during bypass, brain microcirculation was not evaluated. In the present study in animals (pigs), reduction of the number of perfused capillaries was estimated by measurements of the capillary diffusion capacity for hydrophilic tracers of low permeability. Capillary diffusion capacity, cerebral blood flow, and cerebral metabolic rate for glucose were measured simultaneously by the integral method, different tracers being used with different circulation times. In eight animals subjected to normothermic cardiopulmonary bypass, and seven subjected to hypothermic bypass, cerebral blood flow, cerebral metabolic rate for glucose, and capillary diffusion capacity decreased significantly: cerebral blood flow from 63 to 43 ml/100 gm/min in normothermia and to 34 ml/100 gm/min in hypothermia and cerebral metabolic rate for glucose from 43.0 to 23.0 μmol/100 gm/min in normothermia and to 14.1 μmol/100 gm/min in hypothermia. The capillary diffusion capacity declined markedly from 0.15 to 0.03 ml/100 gm/min in normothermia but only to 0.08 ml/100 gm/min in hypothermia. We conclude that the decrease of cerebral metabolic rate for glucose during normothermic cardiopulmonary bypass is caused by interruption of blood flow through a part of the capillary bed, possibly by microemboli, and that cerebral blood flow is an adequate indicator of capillary blood flow. Further studies must clarify why normal microvascular function appears to be preserved during hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)727-732
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery
Volume94
Issue number5
StatePublished - 1987
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Cerebrovascular Circulation
Cardiopulmonary Bypass
Brain
Glucose
Hypothermia
Intracranial Embolism
Microcirculation
Microvessels
Permeability
Swine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Surgery

Cite this

Sorensen, H. R., Husum, B., Waaben, J., Andersen, K., Andersen, L. I., Gefke, K., ... Gjedde, A. (1987). Brain microvascular function during cardiopulmonary bypass. Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, 94(5), 727-732.

Brain microvascular function during cardiopulmonary bypass. / Sorensen, H. R.; Husum, B.; Waaben, J.; Andersen, K.; Andersen, L. I.; Gefke, K.; Kaarsen, A. L.; Gjedde, A.

In: Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Vol. 94, No. 5, 1987, p. 727-732.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sorensen, HR, Husum, B, Waaben, J, Andersen, K, Andersen, LI, Gefke, K, Kaarsen, AL & Gjedde, A 1987, 'Brain microvascular function during cardiopulmonary bypass', Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, vol. 94, no. 5, pp. 727-732.
Sorensen HR, Husum B, Waaben J, Andersen K, Andersen LI, Gefke K et al. Brain microvascular function during cardiopulmonary bypass. Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery. 1987;94(5):727-732.
Sorensen, H. R. ; Husum, B. ; Waaben, J. ; Andersen, K. ; Andersen, L. I. ; Gefke, K. ; Kaarsen, A. L. ; Gjedde, A. / Brain microvascular function during cardiopulmonary bypass. In: Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery. 1987 ; Vol. 94, No. 5. pp. 727-732.
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