Brain iron deficiency in idiopathic restless legs syndrome measured by quantitative magnetic susceptibility at 7 tesla

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives Altered brain iron homeostasis with regional iron deficiency has been previously reported in several studies of restless legs syndrome (RLS) patients. Inconsistencies still exist, however, in the reported iron changes in different brain regions and different RLS phenotypes. The purpose of this study was to assess differences in brain iron concentrations between RLS patients and healthy controls and their relation to severity of disease and periodic limb movement during sleep (PLMS). Methods Assessment of brain iron was done using quantitative magnetic susceptibility measurement, which has been shown to correlate well with the tissue iron content in brain's gray matter. Thirty-nine RLS patients and 29 age-matched healthy controls were scanned at 7 T. Magnetic susceptibilities in substantia nigra (SN), thalamus, striatum, and several iron-rich gray matter regions were quantified and compared with related clinical measures. Results Compared with healthy controls, RLS patients showed significantly decreased magnetic susceptibility in the thalamus and dentate nucleus. No significant difference was found in the SN between RLS patients and healthy controls, but a significant correlation was observed between magnetic susceptibility in SN and the PLMS measure. Conclusions Using quantitative magnetic susceptibility as an in vivo indicator of brain iron content, the present study supports the general hypothesis of brain iron deficiency in RLS and indicates its possible link to PLMS.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages75-82
Number of pages8
JournalSleep Medicine
Volume22
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2016

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Restless Legs Syndrome
Iron
Brain
Substantia Nigra
Sleep
Extremities
Thalamus
Familial Mediterranean Fever
Cerebellar Nuclei
Homeostasis
Phenotype

Keywords

  • Brain iron deficiency
  • Periodic limb movement during sleep
  • Quantitative susceptibility mapping
  • Restless legs syndrome

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

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title = "Brain iron deficiency in idiopathic restless legs syndrome measured by quantitative magnetic susceptibility at 7 tesla",
abstract = "Objectives Altered brain iron homeostasis with regional iron deficiency has been previously reported in several studies of restless legs syndrome (RLS) patients. Inconsistencies still exist, however, in the reported iron changes in different brain regions and different RLS phenotypes. The purpose of this study was to assess differences in brain iron concentrations between RLS patients and healthy controls and their relation to severity of disease and periodic limb movement during sleep (PLMS). Methods Assessment of brain iron was done using quantitative magnetic susceptibility measurement, which has been shown to correlate well with the tissue iron content in brain's gray matter. Thirty-nine RLS patients and 29 age-matched healthy controls were scanned at 7 T. Magnetic susceptibilities in substantia nigra (SN), thalamus, striatum, and several iron-rich gray matter regions were quantified and compared with related clinical measures. Results Compared with healthy controls, RLS patients showed significantly decreased magnetic susceptibility in the thalamus and dentate nucleus. No significant difference was found in the SN between RLS patients and healthy controls, but a significant correlation was observed between magnetic susceptibility in SN and the PLMS measure. Conclusions Using quantitative magnetic susceptibility as an in vivo indicator of brain iron content, the present study supports the general hypothesis of brain iron deficiency in RLS and indicates its possible link to PLMS.",
keywords = "Brain iron deficiency, Periodic limb movement during sleep, Quantitative susceptibility mapping, Restless legs syndrome",
author = "Xu Li and Allen, {Richard P.} and Earley, {Christopher J.} and Hongjun Liu and Cruz, {Tiana E.} and Edden, {Richard A E} and Barker, {Peter B.} and {van Zijl}, {Peter C M}",
year = "2016",
month = "6",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.sleep.2016.05.001",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "22",
pages = "75--82",
journal = "Sleep Medicine",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Brain iron deficiency in idiopathic restless legs syndrome measured by quantitative magnetic susceptibility at 7 tesla

AU - Li,Xu

AU - Allen,Richard P.

AU - Earley,Christopher J.

AU - Liu,Hongjun

AU - Cruz,Tiana E.

AU - Edden,Richard A E

AU - Barker,Peter B.

AU - van Zijl,Peter C M

PY - 2016/6/1

Y1 - 2016/6/1

N2 - Objectives Altered brain iron homeostasis with regional iron deficiency has been previously reported in several studies of restless legs syndrome (RLS) patients. Inconsistencies still exist, however, in the reported iron changes in different brain regions and different RLS phenotypes. The purpose of this study was to assess differences in brain iron concentrations between RLS patients and healthy controls and their relation to severity of disease and periodic limb movement during sleep (PLMS). Methods Assessment of brain iron was done using quantitative magnetic susceptibility measurement, which has been shown to correlate well with the tissue iron content in brain's gray matter. Thirty-nine RLS patients and 29 age-matched healthy controls were scanned at 7 T. Magnetic susceptibilities in substantia nigra (SN), thalamus, striatum, and several iron-rich gray matter regions were quantified and compared with related clinical measures. Results Compared with healthy controls, RLS patients showed significantly decreased magnetic susceptibility in the thalamus and dentate nucleus. No significant difference was found in the SN between RLS patients and healthy controls, but a significant correlation was observed between magnetic susceptibility in SN and the PLMS measure. Conclusions Using quantitative magnetic susceptibility as an in vivo indicator of brain iron content, the present study supports the general hypothesis of brain iron deficiency in RLS and indicates its possible link to PLMS.

AB - Objectives Altered brain iron homeostasis with regional iron deficiency has been previously reported in several studies of restless legs syndrome (RLS) patients. Inconsistencies still exist, however, in the reported iron changes in different brain regions and different RLS phenotypes. The purpose of this study was to assess differences in brain iron concentrations between RLS patients and healthy controls and their relation to severity of disease and periodic limb movement during sleep (PLMS). Methods Assessment of brain iron was done using quantitative magnetic susceptibility measurement, which has been shown to correlate well with the tissue iron content in brain's gray matter. Thirty-nine RLS patients and 29 age-matched healthy controls were scanned at 7 T. Magnetic susceptibilities in substantia nigra (SN), thalamus, striatum, and several iron-rich gray matter regions were quantified and compared with related clinical measures. Results Compared with healthy controls, RLS patients showed significantly decreased magnetic susceptibility in the thalamus and dentate nucleus. No significant difference was found in the SN between RLS patients and healthy controls, but a significant correlation was observed between magnetic susceptibility in SN and the PLMS measure. Conclusions Using quantitative magnetic susceptibility as an in vivo indicator of brain iron content, the present study supports the general hypothesis of brain iron deficiency in RLS and indicates its possible link to PLMS.

KW - Brain iron deficiency

KW - Periodic limb movement during sleep

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KW - Restless legs syndrome

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