Brain imaging demonstrates a reduced neural impact of eating in obesity

Nancy Puzziferri, Jeffrey M. Zigman, Binu P. Thomas, Perry Mihalakos, Ryan Gallagher, Michael Lutter, Thomas Carmody, Hanzhang Lu, Carol A. Tamminga

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: This study investigated functional brain response differences to food in women with BMI either 2 (lean) or >35 kg/m2 (severe obesity). Design and Methods: Thirty women, 18-65 years old, from academic medical centers participated. Baseline brain perfusion was measured with arterial spin labeling. Brain activity was measured via blood-oxygen-level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging in response to food cues, and appeal to cues was rated. Subjective hunger/fullness was reported pre- and post-imaging. After a standard meal, measures were repeated. Results: When fasting, brain perfusion did not differ significantly between groups; and both groups showed significantly increased activity in the neo- and limbic cortices and midbrain compared with baseline (P

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalObesity
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2016
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Neuroimaging
Obesity
Eating
Brain
Cues
Perfusion
Food
Hunger
Morbid Obesity
Mesencephalon
Meals
Fasting
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Oxygen

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Puzziferri, N., Zigman, J. M., Thomas, B. P., Mihalakos, P., Gallagher, R., Lutter, M., ... Tamminga, C. A. (Accepted/In press). Brain imaging demonstrates a reduced neural impact of eating in obesity. Obesity. https://doi.org/10.1002/oby.21424

Brain imaging demonstrates a reduced neural impact of eating in obesity. / Puzziferri, Nancy; Zigman, Jeffrey M.; Thomas, Binu P.; Mihalakos, Perry; Gallagher, Ryan; Lutter, Michael; Carmody, Thomas; Lu, Hanzhang; Tamminga, Carol A.

In: Obesity, 2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Puzziferri, N, Zigman, JM, Thomas, BP, Mihalakos, P, Gallagher, R, Lutter, M, Carmody, T, Lu, H & Tamminga, CA 2016, 'Brain imaging demonstrates a reduced neural impact of eating in obesity', Obesity. https://doi.org/10.1002/oby.21424
Puzziferri N, Zigman JM, Thomas BP, Mihalakos P, Gallagher R, Lutter M et al. Brain imaging demonstrates a reduced neural impact of eating in obesity. Obesity. 2016. https://doi.org/10.1002/oby.21424
Puzziferri, Nancy ; Zigman, Jeffrey M. ; Thomas, Binu P. ; Mihalakos, Perry ; Gallagher, Ryan ; Lutter, Michael ; Carmody, Thomas ; Lu, Hanzhang ; Tamminga, Carol A. / Brain imaging demonstrates a reduced neural impact of eating in obesity. In: Obesity. 2016.
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