Brain connectivity during verbal working memory in children and adolescents

Gerbrich E. van den Bosch, Hanan El Marroun, Marcus N. Schmidt, Dick Tibboel, Dara S. Manoach, Vince Daniel Calhoun, Tonya J H White

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Working memory (WkM) is a fundamental cognitive process that serves as a building block for higher order cognitive functions. While studies have shown that children and adolescents utilize similar brain regions during verbal WkM, there have been few studies that evaluate the developmental differences in brain connectivity. Our goal was to study the development of brain connectivity related to verbal WkM in typically developing children and adolescents. Thirty-five healthy children and adolescents, divided into three groups: 9-12 (children), 13-16 (young adolescents), and 17-19 (older adolescents) years, were included in this functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study. The verbal WkM task involved a modified Sternberg item recognition paradigm using three different loads. Brain connectivity analysis was performed using independent component analyses and regressing the components with the design matrix to determine task-related networks. Connectivity analyses resulted in four components associated solely with encoding, four solely with recognition and two with both. Two networks demonstrated age-related differences with respect to load, (1) the left motor area and right cerebellum, and 2) the left prefrontal cortex, left parietal lobe, and right cerebellum. Post hoc analyses revealed that the first network showed significant effects of age between children and the two older groups. There was increasing connectivity with increasing load for adolescents. The second network demonstrated age-related differences between children and older adolescents. Children have higher task-related connectivity at lower loads, but they tend to equalize with the adolescents with higher loads. Finally, a non-load related network involving the orbital frontal and anterior cingulate cortices showed less connectivity in children. Hum Brain Mapp 35:698-711, 2014.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)698-711
Number of pages14
JournalHuman Brain Mapping
Volume35
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2014
Externally publishedYes

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Short-Term Memory
Brain
Cerebellum
Parietal Lobe
Gyrus Cinguli
Motor Cortex
Prefrontal Cortex
Cognition
Magnetic Resonance Imaging

Keywords

  • Adolescents
  • Brain connectivity
  • Children
  • Development
  • FMRI
  • Verbal working memory

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Anatomy
  • Neurology
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology

Cite this

van den Bosch, G. E., Marroun, H. E., Schmidt, M. N., Tibboel, D., Manoach, D. S., Calhoun, V. D., & White, T. J. H. (2014). Brain connectivity during verbal working memory in children and adolescents. Human Brain Mapping, 35(2), 698-711. https://doi.org/10.1002/hbm.22193

Brain connectivity during verbal working memory in children and adolescents. / van den Bosch, Gerbrich E.; Marroun, Hanan El; Schmidt, Marcus N.; Tibboel, Dick; Manoach, Dara S.; Calhoun, Vince Daniel; White, Tonya J H.

In: Human Brain Mapping, Vol. 35, No. 2, 02.2014, p. 698-711.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

van den Bosch, GE, Marroun, HE, Schmidt, MN, Tibboel, D, Manoach, DS, Calhoun, VD & White, TJH 2014, 'Brain connectivity during verbal working memory in children and adolescents', Human Brain Mapping, vol. 35, no. 2, pp. 698-711. https://doi.org/10.1002/hbm.22193
van den Bosch GE, Marroun HE, Schmidt MN, Tibboel D, Manoach DS, Calhoun VD et al. Brain connectivity during verbal working memory in children and adolescents. Human Brain Mapping. 2014 Feb;35(2):698-711. https://doi.org/10.1002/hbm.22193
van den Bosch, Gerbrich E. ; Marroun, Hanan El ; Schmidt, Marcus N. ; Tibboel, Dick ; Manoach, Dara S. ; Calhoun, Vince Daniel ; White, Tonya J H. / Brain connectivity during verbal working memory in children and adolescents. In: Human Brain Mapping. 2014 ; Vol. 35, No. 2. pp. 698-711.
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