Boveri revisited: Chromosomal instability, aneuploidy and tumorigenesis

Andrew Holland, Don W. Cleveland

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The mitotic checkpoint is a major cell cycle control mechanism that guards against chromosome missegregation and the subsequent production of aneuploid daughter cells. Most cancer cells are aneuploid and frequently missegregate chromosomes during mitosis. Indeed, aneuploidy is a common characteristic of tumours, and, for over 100 years, it has been proposed to drive tumour progression. However, recent evidence has revealed that although aneuploidy can increase the potential for cellular transformation, it also acts to antagonize tumorigenesis in certain genetic contexts. A clearer understanding of the tumour suppressive function of aneuploidy might reveal new avenues for anticancer therapy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)478-487
Number of pages10
JournalNature Reviews Molecular Cell Biology
Volume10
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2009
Externally publishedYes

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Chromosomal Instability
Aneuploidy
Carcinogenesis
Neoplasms
Chromosomes
M Phase Cell Cycle Checkpoints
Cell Cycle Checkpoints
Mitosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Boveri revisited : Chromosomal instability, aneuploidy and tumorigenesis. / Holland, Andrew; Cleveland, Don W.

In: Nature Reviews Molecular Cell Biology, Vol. 10, No. 7, 07.2009, p. 478-487.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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