Bone marrow-derived cells present MHC class I-restricted tumour antigens in priming of antitumour immune responses.

A. Y. Huang, P. Golumbek, M. Ahmadzadeh, E. Jaffee, D. Pardoll, H. Levitsky

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Many tumours express tumour-specific antigens capable of being presented to CD8+ T cells by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules. Current models of antigen presentation predict that the tumour cell itself should present its own MHC class I-restricted antigens to T cells. Earlier cross-priming experiments have demonstrated that at least some MHC class I-restricted antigens may also be presented by bystander cells. There is no detectable presentation of MHC class I-restricted tumour antigens by the tumour itself during priming of tumour-specific responses. The tumour antigens are presented exclusively by host bone marrow-derived cells. These results imply that an efficient mechanism exists in vivo for transfer of MHC I-restricted antigens to bone marrow-derived antigen presenting cells. They also suggest that HLA matching may not be critical in the clinical application of allogeneic tumour vaccines.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)229-240; discussion 240-244
JournalCiba Foundation symposium
Volume187
StatePublished - 1994

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