BOLD correlations to force in precision grip: An event-related study

James S. Sulzer, Vikram S. Chib, Marie Claude Hepp-Reymond, Spyros Kollias, Roger Gassert

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

The introduction of functional neuroimaging has resulted in a profusion of knowledge on various topics, including how blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signal in the brain is related to force. To date, studies that have explicitly examined this relationship have used block designs. To gain a better understanding of the networks involved in human motor control, analyses sensitive to temporal relationships, such as Granger Causality or Dynamic Causal Modeling, require event-related designs. Therefore the goal of this experiment was to examine whether similar or even better relationships between BOLD and force during precision grip could be determined with an event-related design. Five healthy subjects exerted forces at 10%, 20% and 30% of maximum voluntary force, along with an observation condition. We report that the BOLD signal was linearly correlated with precision grip force in primary sensorimotor cortex and cerebellum, showing slightly better correlations than previous work. The results provide a clearer picture regarding the sensitivity of BOLD signal to force and show that event-related designs can be more appropriate than block designs in motor tasks.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication33rd Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBS 2011
Pages2342-2346
Number of pages5
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 26 2011
Externally publishedYes
Event33rd Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBS 2011 - Boston, MA, United States
Duration: Aug 30 2011Sep 3 2011

Publication series

NameProceedings of the Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBS
ISSN (Print)1557-170X

Other

Other33rd Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBS 2011
CountryUnited States
CityBoston, MA
Period8/30/119/3/11

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Signal Processing
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition
  • Health Informatics

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'BOLD correlations to force in precision grip: An event-related study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this