Blood pressure during sustained inhibitory breathing in the natural environment

DAVID E. ANDERSON, JOY AUSTIN, JENNIFER A. HAYTHORNTHWAITE

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Previous studies reported that breathing frequency of laboratory dogs decreased preceding the onset of an avoidance task and that this decrease was accompanied by increases in blood pressure and decreases in heart rate. Low frequency/normal tidal volume breathing has also been observed in ambulatory humans, but the cardiovascular concomitants of this inhibitory breathing pattern remain to be determined. The present study recorded blood pressure and heart rate in humans during periods of inhibitory breathing in the natural environment. Systolic and mean pressure were higher during inhibitory breathing than at other times, but no differences in diastolic pressure or heart rate were observed. Inhibitory breathing was differentially associated with the workplace and with social situations. Thus, major components of a physiological pattern that predisposes laboratory animals to sodium‐sensitive experimental hypertension have now been observed to covary in ambulatory humans. Whether inhibitory breathing in the natural environment is a correlate or a cause of elevated blood pressure remains to be determined.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)131-137
Number of pages7
JournalPSYCHOPHYSIOLOGY
Volume30
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1993
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Blood pressure
  • Cardiovascular ambulatory monitoring
  • Heart rate
  • Respiration

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Endocrine and Autonomic Systems
  • Developmental Neuroscience
  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Biological Psychiatry

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