Blood banking in China

Hua Shan, Jing Xing Wang, Fu Rong Ren, Yuan Zhi Zhang, Hai Yan Zhao, Guo Jing Gao, Yang Ji, Paul Michael Ness

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

While transfusion-transmissible diseases, including AIDS and viral hepatitis, continue to spread especially in developing countries, the issue of safeguarding the world's blood supply is of paramount importance. China houses more than 20% of the earth's population, and thus its blood supply has the potential to affect the global community. In recent years, Chinese blood centres have tried to improve the nation's blood safety. Although substantial progress has already been made, many daunting difficulties remain. Traditional cultural barriers need to be overcome to successfully mobilise volunteer blood donors. Gaps in information and technology still need to be closed. Insufficiency of economic resources also restrict the blood bank industry. Other developing countries face many of the same challenges as China.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1770-1775
Number of pages6
JournalThe Lancet
Volume360
Issue number9347
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 30 2002

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Blood Banks
China
Developing Countries
Blood Safety
Blood Donors
Hepatitis
Volunteers
Industry
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
Economics
Technology
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Shan, H., Wang, J. X., Ren, F. R., Zhang, Y. Z., Zhao, H. Y., Gao, G. J., ... Ness, P. M. (2002). Blood banking in China. The Lancet, 360(9347), 1770-1775. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(02)11669-2

Blood banking in China. / Shan, Hua; Wang, Jing Xing; Ren, Fu Rong; Zhang, Yuan Zhi; Zhao, Hai Yan; Gao, Guo Jing; Ji, Yang; Ness, Paul Michael.

In: The Lancet, Vol. 360, No. 9347, 30.11.2002, p. 1770-1775.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Shan, H, Wang, JX, Ren, FR, Zhang, YZ, Zhao, HY, Gao, GJ, Ji, Y & Ness, PM 2002, 'Blood banking in China', The Lancet, vol. 360, no. 9347, pp. 1770-1775. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(02)11669-2
Shan H, Wang JX, Ren FR, Zhang YZ, Zhao HY, Gao GJ et al. Blood banking in China. The Lancet. 2002 Nov 30;360(9347):1770-1775. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(02)11669-2
Shan, Hua ; Wang, Jing Xing ; Ren, Fu Rong ; Zhang, Yuan Zhi ; Zhao, Hai Yan ; Gao, Guo Jing ; Ji, Yang ; Ness, Paul Michael. / Blood banking in China. In: The Lancet. 2002 ; Vol. 360, No. 9347. pp. 1770-1775.
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