Black-white disparities in overweight and obesity trends by educational attainment in the United States, 1997-2008

Chandra L. Jackson, Moyses Szklo, Hsin Chieh Yeh, Nae Yuh Wang, Rosemary Dray-Spira, Roland J Thorpe, Frederick L. Brancati

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Abstract

Background. Few studies have examined racial and educational disparities in recent population-based trends. Methods. We analyzed data of a nationally representative sample of 174,228 US-born adults in the National Health Interview Survey from 1997 to 2008. We determined mean BMI trends by educational attainment and race and black-white prevalence ratios (PRs) for overweight/obesity (BMI > 25 kg/m2) using adjusted Poisson regression with robust variance. Results. From 1997 to 2008, BMI increased by ≥1 kg/m2 in all race-sex groups, and appeared to increase faster among whites. Blacks with greater than a high school education (GHSE) had a consistently higher BMI over time than whites in both women (28.3 ± 0.14 to 29.7 ± 0.18 kg/m2 versus 25.8 ± 0.58 to 26.5 ± 0.08 kg/m2) and men (28.1 ± 0.17 kg/m2 to 29.0 ± 0.20 versus 27.1 ± 0.04 kg/m2 to 28.1 ± 0.06 kg/m2). For participants of all educational attainment levels, age-adjusted overweight/obesity was greater by 44% (95% CI: 1.42-1.46) in black versus white women and 2% (1.01-1.04) in men. Among those with GHSE, overweight/obesity prevalence was greater (PR: 1.52; 1.49-1.55) in black versus white women, but greater (1.07; 1.05-1.09) in men. Conclusions. BMI increased steadily in all race-sex and education groups from 1997 to 2008, and blacks (particularly women) had a consistently higher BMI than their white counterparts. Overweight/obesity trends and racial disparities were more prominent among individuals with higher education levels, compared to their counterparts with lower education levels.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number140743
JournalJournal of Obesity
Volume2013
DOIs
StatePublished - 2013

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Obesity
Education
Sex Education
Health Surveys
Interviews
hydroquinone
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Medicine(all)

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Black-white disparities in overweight and obesity trends by educational attainment in the United States, 1997-2008. / Jackson, Chandra L.; Szklo, Moyses; Yeh, Hsin Chieh; Wang, Nae Yuh; Dray-Spira, Rosemary; Thorpe, Roland J; Brancati, Frederick L.

In: Journal of Obesity, Vol. 2013, 140743, 2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Background. Few studies have examined racial and educational disparities in recent population-based trends. Methods. We analyzed data of a nationally representative sample of 174,228 US-born adults in the National Health Interview Survey from 1997 to 2008. We determined mean BMI trends by educational attainment and race and black-white prevalence ratios (PRs) for overweight/obesity (BMI > 25 kg/m2) using adjusted Poisson regression with robust variance. Results. From 1997 to 2008, BMI increased by ≥1 kg/m2 in all race-sex groups, and appeared to increase faster among whites. Blacks with greater than a high school education (GHSE) had a consistently higher BMI over time than whites in both women (28.3 ± 0.14 to 29.7 ± 0.18 kg/m2 versus 25.8 ± 0.58 to 26.5 ± 0.08 kg/m2) and men (28.1 ± 0.17 kg/m2 to 29.0 ± 0.20 versus 27.1 ± 0.04 kg/m2 to 28.1 ± 0.06 kg/m2). For participants of all educational attainment levels, age-adjusted overweight/obesity was greater by 44{\%} (95{\%} CI: 1.42-1.46) in black versus white women and 2{\%} (1.01-1.04) in men. Among those with GHSE, overweight/obesity prevalence was greater (PR: 1.52; 1.49-1.55) in black versus white women, but greater (1.07; 1.05-1.09) in men. Conclusions. BMI increased steadily in all race-sex and education groups from 1997 to 2008, and blacks (particularly women) had a consistently higher BMI than their white counterparts. Overweight/obesity trends and racial disparities were more prominent among individuals with higher education levels, compared to their counterparts with lower education levels.",
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AU - Jackson, Chandra L.

AU - Szklo, Moyses

AU - Yeh, Hsin Chieh

AU - Wang, Nae Yuh

AU - Dray-Spira, Rosemary

AU - Thorpe, Roland J

AU - Brancati, Frederick L.

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