Black-white differences in subclinical cardiovascular disease among older adults: The cardiovascular health study

Teri A. Manolio, Gregory L. Burke, Bruce M. Psaty, Anne B. Newman, Mary Haan, Neil Powe, Russell P. Tracy, Daniel H. O'Leary

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Cardiovascular and all-cause mortality are higher in black than white Americans, but racial differences in clinical and subclinical cardiovascular disease (CVD) have not been examined in older adults. Clinical and subclinical CVD and its risk factors were compared in 4926 white and 244 black men and women aged 65 years and older. Black participants had lower socioeconomic status and generally higher prevalences of CVD and its risk factors, except for adverse lipid profiles. Common carotid wall thickness was greater in black than white women, and ankle-arm blood pressure ratios were lower in black women and men (p < 0.01). After adjustment for CVD risk factors, common carotid walls were significantly thicker and ankle-arm ratios were lower in blacks than whites of both sexes, while internal carotid walls were significantly thinner in black women. Racial differences in clinical and subclinical CVD in older adults are similar to those reported in younger populations and do not appear to be explained by CVD risk factors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1141-1152
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Clinical Epidemiology
Volume48
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1995

Keywords

  • Aged
  • Atherosclerosis
  • Cardiovascular disease
  • Epidemiology
  • Racial differences
  • Risk factors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology

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