Bisphosphonate delivery to tubular bone allografts

Gene R. DiResta, Mark W. Manoso, Anwar Naqvi, Pat Zanzonico, Peter Smith-Jones, Wakenda Tyler, Carol D Morris, John H. Healey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Large structural allografts used for reconstruction of bone defects after revision arthroplasty and tumor resection fracture up to 27% of the time from osteolytic resorption around the fixation screw holes and tendon or ligament attachment sites. Treating structural allografts before implantation with bisphosphonates may inhibit local osteoclastic processes and prevent bone resorption and the development of stress risers, thereby reducing the long-term fracture rate. Taking advantage of allografts' open-pore structure, we asked whether passive soaking or positive-pressure pumping was a more efficient technique for delivering bisphosphonates. We treated matched pairs of ovine tibial allografts with fluids containing Tc-99m pamidronate and toluidine blue stain to facilitate indicator distribution analysis via microSPECT-microCT imaging and light microscopy, respectively. Surfactants octylphenoxy polyethoxy ethanol or beractant were added to the treatment fluids to reduce flow resistance of solutions pumped through the allografts. Indicator distribution after 1 hour of soaking produced a thin ring around periosteal and endosteal surfaces, while pumping for 10 minutes produced a more even distribution throughout the allograft. Flow resistance was reduced with octylphenoxy polyethoxy ethanol but unaffected with beractant. Pumped allografts displayed a more homogeneous indicator distribution in less time than soaking while surfactants enhanced fluid movement.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1871-1879
Number of pages9
JournalClinical Orthopaedics and Related Research
Volume466
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2008
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Diphosphonates
Allografts
Bone and Bones
pamidronate
Surface-Active Agents
Ethanol
X-Ray Microtomography
Tolonium Chloride
Bone Development
Bone Resorption
Ligaments
Arthroplasty
Tendons
Microscopy
Sheep
Coloring Agents
Light
Pressure
Neoplasms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

DiResta, G. R., Manoso, M. W., Naqvi, A., Zanzonico, P., Smith-Jones, P., Tyler, W., ... Healey, J. H. (2008). Bisphosphonate delivery to tubular bone allografts. Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research, 466(8), 1871-1879. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11999-008-0259-7

Bisphosphonate delivery to tubular bone allografts. / DiResta, Gene R.; Manoso, Mark W.; Naqvi, Anwar; Zanzonico, Pat; Smith-Jones, Peter; Tyler, Wakenda; Morris, Carol D; Healey, John H.

In: Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research, Vol. 466, No. 8, 08.2008, p. 1871-1879.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

DiResta, GR, Manoso, MW, Naqvi, A, Zanzonico, P, Smith-Jones, P, Tyler, W, Morris, CD & Healey, JH 2008, 'Bisphosphonate delivery to tubular bone allografts', Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research, vol. 466, no. 8, pp. 1871-1879. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11999-008-0259-7
DiResta GR, Manoso MW, Naqvi A, Zanzonico P, Smith-Jones P, Tyler W et al. Bisphosphonate delivery to tubular bone allografts. Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research. 2008 Aug;466(8):1871-1879. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11999-008-0259-7
DiResta, Gene R. ; Manoso, Mark W. ; Naqvi, Anwar ; Zanzonico, Pat ; Smith-Jones, Peter ; Tyler, Wakenda ; Morris, Carol D ; Healey, John H. / Bisphosphonate delivery to tubular bone allografts. In: Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research. 2008 ; Vol. 466, No. 8. pp. 1871-1879.
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