Birth mode-dependent association between pre-pregnancy maternal weight status and the neonatal intestinal microbiome

Noel Mueller, Hakdong Shin, Aline Pizoni, Isabel C. Werlang, Ursula Matte, Marcelo Z. Goldani, Helena A S Goldani, Maria Gloria Dominguez-Bello

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The intestinal microbiome is a unique ecosystem that influences metabolism in humans. Experimental evidence indicates that intestinal microbiota can transfer an obese phenotype from humans to mice. Since mothers transmit intestinal microbiota to their offspring during labor, we hypothesized that among vaginal deliveries, maternal body mass index is associated with neonatal gut microbiota composition. We report the association of maternal pre-pregnancy body mass index on stool microbiota from 74 neonates, 18 born vaginally (5 to overweight or obese mothers) and 56 by elective C-section (26 to overweight or obese mothers). Compared to neonates delivered vaginally to normal weight mothers, neonates born to overweight or obese mothers had a distinct gut microbiota community structure (weighted UniFrac distance PERMANOVA, p <0.001), enriched in Bacteroides and depleted in Enterococcus, Acinetobacter, Pseudomonas, and Hydrogenophilus. We show that these microbial signatures are predicted to result in functional differences in metabolic signaling and energy regulation. In contrast, among elective Cesarean deliveries, maternal body mass index was not associated with neonatal gut microbiota community structure (weighted UniFrac distance PERMANOVA, p = 0.628). Our findings indicate that excess maternal pre-pregnancy weight is associated with differences in neonatal acquisition of microbiota during vaginal delivery, but not Cesarean delivery. These differences may translate to altered maintenance of metabolic health in the offspring.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number23133
JournalScientific Reports
Volume6
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2016

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Mothers
Parturition
Weights and Measures
Pregnancy
Body Mass Index
Microbiota
Bacteroides
Acinetobacter
Enterococcus
Pseudomonas
Ecosystem
Gastrointestinal Microbiome
Phenotype
Health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

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Birth mode-dependent association between pre-pregnancy maternal weight status and the neonatal intestinal microbiome. / Mueller, Noel; Shin, Hakdong; Pizoni, Aline; Werlang, Isabel C.; Matte, Ursula; Goldani, Marcelo Z.; Goldani, Helena A S; Dominguez-Bello, Maria Gloria.

In: Scientific Reports, Vol. 6, 23133, 01.04.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mueller, N, Shin, H, Pizoni, A, Werlang, IC, Matte, U, Goldani, MZ, Goldani, HAS & Dominguez-Bello, MG 2016, 'Birth mode-dependent association between pre-pregnancy maternal weight status and the neonatal intestinal microbiome', Scientific Reports, vol. 6, 23133. https://doi.org/10.1038/srep23133
Mueller, Noel ; Shin, Hakdong ; Pizoni, Aline ; Werlang, Isabel C. ; Matte, Ursula ; Goldani, Marcelo Z. ; Goldani, Helena A S ; Dominguez-Bello, Maria Gloria. / Birth mode-dependent association between pre-pregnancy maternal weight status and the neonatal intestinal microbiome. In: Scientific Reports. 2016 ; Vol. 6.
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