Biomedical science Ph.D. career interest patterns by race/ethnicity and gender

Kenneth D. Gibbs, John McGready, Jessica C. Bennett, Kimberly Griffin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Increasing biomedical workforce diversity remains a persistent challenge. Recent reports have shown that biomedical sciences (BMS) graduate students become less interested in faculty careers as training progresses; however, it is unclear whether or how the career preferences of women and underrepresented minority (URM) scientists change in manners distinct from their better-represented peers. We report results from a survey of 1500 recent American BMS Ph.D. graduates (including 276 URMs) that examined career preferences over the course of their graduate training experiences. On average, scientists from all social backgrounds showed significantly decreased interest in faculty careers at research universities, and significantly increased interest in non-research careers at Ph.D.completion relative to entry. However, group differences emerged in overall levels of interest (at Ph.D. entry and completion), and the magnitude of change in interest in these careers. Multiple logistic regression showed that when controlling for career pathway interest at Ph.D. entry, first-author publication rate, faculty support, research self-efficacy, and graduate training experiences, differences in career pathway interest between social identity groups persisted. All groups were less likely than men from well-represented (WR) racial/ethnic backgrounds to report high interest in faculty careers at research-intensive universities (URM men: OR 0.60, 95% CI: 0.36-0.98, p=0.04; WR women: OR: 0.64, 95% CI: 0.47-0.89, p=0.008; URM women: OR: 0.46, 95% CI: 0.30-0.71, p

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere114736
JournalPLoS One
Volume9
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 10 2014

Fingerprint

nationalities and ethnic groups
gender
self-efficacy
university research
research support
labor force
Research
peers
Social Identification
Logistics
students
Self Efficacy
Students
Publications
Logistic Models

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Biomedical science Ph.D. career interest patterns by race/ethnicity and gender. / Gibbs, Kenneth D.; McGready, John; Bennett, Jessica C.; Griffin, Kimberly.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 9, No. 12, e114736, 10.12.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gibbs, Kenneth D. ; McGready, John ; Bennett, Jessica C. ; Griffin, Kimberly. / Biomedical science Ph.D. career interest patterns by race/ethnicity and gender. In: PLoS One. 2014 ; Vol. 9, No. 12.
@article{d199861649da4dbd89e453943fbc17e5,
title = "Biomedical science Ph.D. career interest patterns by race/ethnicity and gender",
abstract = "Increasing biomedical workforce diversity remains a persistent challenge. Recent reports have shown that biomedical sciences (BMS) graduate students become less interested in faculty careers as training progresses; however, it is unclear whether or how the career preferences of women and underrepresented minority (URM) scientists change in manners distinct from their better-represented peers. We report results from a survey of 1500 recent American BMS Ph.D. graduates (including 276 URMs) that examined career preferences over the course of their graduate training experiences. On average, scientists from all social backgrounds showed significantly decreased interest in faculty careers at research universities, and significantly increased interest in non-research careers at Ph.D.completion relative to entry. However, group differences emerged in overall levels of interest (at Ph.D. entry and completion), and the magnitude of change in interest in these careers. Multiple logistic regression showed that when controlling for career pathway interest at Ph.D. entry, first-author publication rate, faculty support, research self-efficacy, and graduate training experiences, differences in career pathway interest between social identity groups persisted. All groups were less likely than men from well-represented (WR) racial/ethnic backgrounds to report high interest in faculty careers at research-intensive universities (URM men: OR 0.60, 95{\%} CI: 0.36-0.98, p=0.04; WR women: OR: 0.64, 95{\%} CI: 0.47-0.89, p=0.008; URM women: OR: 0.46, 95{\%} CI: 0.30-0.71, p",
author = "Gibbs, {Kenneth D.} and John McGready and Bennett, {Jessica C.} and Kimberly Griffin",
year = "2014",
month = "12",
day = "10",
doi = "10.1371/journal.pone.0114736",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "9",
journal = "PLoS One",
issn = "1932-6203",
publisher = "Public Library of Science",
number = "12",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Biomedical science Ph.D. career interest patterns by race/ethnicity and gender

AU - Gibbs, Kenneth D.

AU - McGready, John

AU - Bennett, Jessica C.

AU - Griffin, Kimberly

PY - 2014/12/10

Y1 - 2014/12/10

N2 - Increasing biomedical workforce diversity remains a persistent challenge. Recent reports have shown that biomedical sciences (BMS) graduate students become less interested in faculty careers as training progresses; however, it is unclear whether or how the career preferences of women and underrepresented minority (URM) scientists change in manners distinct from their better-represented peers. We report results from a survey of 1500 recent American BMS Ph.D. graduates (including 276 URMs) that examined career preferences over the course of their graduate training experiences. On average, scientists from all social backgrounds showed significantly decreased interest in faculty careers at research universities, and significantly increased interest in non-research careers at Ph.D.completion relative to entry. However, group differences emerged in overall levels of interest (at Ph.D. entry and completion), and the magnitude of change in interest in these careers. Multiple logistic regression showed that when controlling for career pathway interest at Ph.D. entry, first-author publication rate, faculty support, research self-efficacy, and graduate training experiences, differences in career pathway interest between social identity groups persisted. All groups were less likely than men from well-represented (WR) racial/ethnic backgrounds to report high interest in faculty careers at research-intensive universities (URM men: OR 0.60, 95% CI: 0.36-0.98, p=0.04; WR women: OR: 0.64, 95% CI: 0.47-0.89, p=0.008; URM women: OR: 0.46, 95% CI: 0.30-0.71, p

AB - Increasing biomedical workforce diversity remains a persistent challenge. Recent reports have shown that biomedical sciences (BMS) graduate students become less interested in faculty careers as training progresses; however, it is unclear whether or how the career preferences of women and underrepresented minority (URM) scientists change in manners distinct from their better-represented peers. We report results from a survey of 1500 recent American BMS Ph.D. graduates (including 276 URMs) that examined career preferences over the course of their graduate training experiences. On average, scientists from all social backgrounds showed significantly decreased interest in faculty careers at research universities, and significantly increased interest in non-research careers at Ph.D.completion relative to entry. However, group differences emerged in overall levels of interest (at Ph.D. entry and completion), and the magnitude of change in interest in these careers. Multiple logistic regression showed that when controlling for career pathway interest at Ph.D. entry, first-author publication rate, faculty support, research self-efficacy, and graduate training experiences, differences in career pathway interest between social identity groups persisted. All groups were less likely than men from well-represented (WR) racial/ethnic backgrounds to report high interest in faculty careers at research-intensive universities (URM men: OR 0.60, 95% CI: 0.36-0.98, p=0.04; WR women: OR: 0.64, 95% CI: 0.47-0.89, p=0.008; URM women: OR: 0.46, 95% CI: 0.30-0.71, p

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84916890293&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84916890293&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1371/journal.pone.0114736

DO - 10.1371/journal.pone.0114736

M3 - Article

VL - 9

JO - PLoS One

JF - PLoS One

SN - 1932-6203

IS - 12

M1 - e114736

ER -