Biological monitoring of fire fighters: Sister chromatid exchange and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-DNA adducts in peripheral blood cells

S. H. Liou, Paul Timothy Strickland, M. C. Poirier, D. Nguyen, P. T. Strickland, M. S. Tockman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Fire fighters are exposed to potentially carcinogenic combustion and pyrolysis products during the course of their work. The present study was designed to test 43 fire fighters and matched controls for DNA damage which might be related to occupational carcinogen exposures. Using peripheral blood lymphocytes, we examined (a) baseline sister chromatid exchange (SCE) frequency and (b) SCE induction by in vitro mutagenic challenge with mitomycin C. Using nucleated peripheral blood cells, we examined (c) polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-DNA adduct levels by assessing benzo(a)pyrene diol epoxide (BPDE)-DNA antigenicity. Exposures were determined from histories of fire-fighting activity. The presence of confounding factors (e.g., tobacco smoking, charcoal-broiled food consumption, etc.) was determined by questionnaire. Plasma cotinine levels were measured to assess recent exposures to tobacco smoke. White fire fighters exhibited a significantly higher risk for the presence of detectable BPDE-DNA antigenicity than white controls (odds ratio, 3,4; 95% confidence interval, 1.08-10.5 after adjustment). Consumption of charcoal-broiled food <3 times a month was associated with a smaller proportion of individuals exhibiting measurable (positive) BPDE-DNA antigenicity, while consumption of broiled food > 3 times a month did not affect the proportion of positive individuals. Daily alcohol consumption was associated with a larger proportion of individuals exhibiting positive BPDE-DNA antigenicity, (P = 0.07). Tobacco smoking and charcoal-broiled food consumption, but not fire fighting, were associated with increased levels of baseline SCE. Sensitivity to SCE induced by mitomycin C in cultured peripheral lymphocytes was similar in fire fighter and control groups. However, sensitivity of individual fire fighters to mitomycin C-induced SCE was correlated with number of fires fought in the previous 24 h.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)4929-4935
Number of pages7
JournalCancer Research
Volume49
Issue number17
StatePublished - 1989

Fingerprint

Firefighters
Sister Chromatid Exchange
Environmental Monitoring
Blood Cells
Charcoal
Benzo(a)pyrene
Epoxy Compounds
Mitomycin
Food
DNA
Smoking
Lymphocytes
Social Adjustment
Cotinine
Occupational Exposure
Smoke
Alcohol Drinking
Carcinogens
DNA Damage
Tobacco

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

Cite this

Biological monitoring of fire fighters : Sister chromatid exchange and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-DNA adducts in peripheral blood cells. / Liou, S. H.; Strickland, Paul Timothy; Poirier, M. C.; Nguyen, D.; Strickland, P. T.; Tockman, M. S.

In: Cancer Research, Vol. 49, No. 17, 1989, p. 4929-4935.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Liou, S. H. ; Strickland, Paul Timothy ; Poirier, M. C. ; Nguyen, D. ; Strickland, P. T. ; Tockman, M. S. / Biological monitoring of fire fighters : Sister chromatid exchange and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-DNA adducts in peripheral blood cells. In: Cancer Research. 1989 ; Vol. 49, No. 17. pp. 4929-4935.
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