Biological characterization of a simian immunodeficiency virus-like retrovirus (HTLV-IV): Evidence for CD4-associated molecules required for infection

J. A. Hoxie, B. S. Haggarty, S. E. Bonser, J. L. Rackowski, H. Shan, P. J. Kanki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We have analyzed a number of biological features of HTLV-IV, a retrovirus indistinguishable from a macaque isolate of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), and compared this virus with several strains of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Although HTLV-IV was found to be similar to HIV-1 in its tropism for CD4+ lymphocytes, its effects on CD4 expression and the ability of its externalized envelope molecule to form a complex directly with the CD4 molecule, a number of striking differences were noted. Unlike with HIV-1, the range of cells susceptible to HTLV-IV infection and syncytia formation was restricted to a subset of CD4+ cell lines, particularly those that coexpressed CD4 with human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II antigens. An analysis of the patterns of HTLV-IV infection with B x T somatic cell hybrids indicated that for this virus, molecules in addition to CD4 were probably required to facilitate infection and cell fusion. Additional studies of HTLV-IV infection of Sup-T1 cells, which are exquisitely sensitive to cytopathic effects induced by HIV-1, demonstrated that HTLV-IV infection could occur in the absence of cytopathic effects and, remarkably, with minimal or no downmodulation of the CD4 molecule from the cell surface. The failure of HTLV-IV infection to reduce the expression of several CD4 epitopes suggested that the HTLV-IV envelope produced by Sup-T1 cells was altered in its ability to interact with or bind to CD4. Additional differences were also noted in the size of the transmembrane envelope molecule of HTLV-IV produced by Sup-T1 cells, indicating that cell-specific alterations in processing of the HTLV-IV envelope occurred during the production of virus in this cell line. Understanding the basis for these biological differences between HTLV-IV and the HIV-1 viruses may help to elucidate more general mechanisms for pathogenesis of other membranes of the SIV and HIV families of retroviruses.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2557-2568
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Virology
Volume62
Issue number8
StatePublished - 1988
Externally publishedYes

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Retroviridae
Simian immunodeficiency virus
Simian Immunodeficiency Virus
CD4 Antigens
HIV-2
Human immunodeficiency virus 1
Deltaretrovirus Infections
Infection
infection
viruses
cytopathogenicity
HIV-1
cells
Viruses
cell lines
cell fusion
tropisms
giant cells
somatic cells
Macaca

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology

Cite this

Hoxie, J. A., Haggarty, B. S., Bonser, S. E., Rackowski, J. L., Shan, H., & Kanki, P. J. (1988). Biological characterization of a simian immunodeficiency virus-like retrovirus (HTLV-IV): Evidence for CD4-associated molecules required for infection. Journal of Virology, 62(8), 2557-2568.

Biological characterization of a simian immunodeficiency virus-like retrovirus (HTLV-IV) : Evidence for CD4-associated molecules required for infection. / Hoxie, J. A.; Haggarty, B. S.; Bonser, S. E.; Rackowski, J. L.; Shan, H.; Kanki, P. J.

In: Journal of Virology, Vol. 62, No. 8, 1988, p. 2557-2568.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hoxie, JA, Haggarty, BS, Bonser, SE, Rackowski, JL, Shan, H & Kanki, PJ 1988, 'Biological characterization of a simian immunodeficiency virus-like retrovirus (HTLV-IV): Evidence for CD4-associated molecules required for infection', Journal of Virology, vol. 62, no. 8, pp. 2557-2568.
Hoxie, J. A. ; Haggarty, B. S. ; Bonser, S. E. ; Rackowski, J. L. ; Shan, H. ; Kanki, P. J. / Biological characterization of a simian immunodeficiency virus-like retrovirus (HTLV-IV) : Evidence for CD4-associated molecules required for infection. In: Journal of Virology. 1988 ; Vol. 62, No. 8. pp. 2557-2568.
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