Beyond the serotonin hypothesis: A role for dopamine in some forms of obsessive compulsive disorder?

W. K. Goodman, C. J. McDougle, L. H. Price, M. A. Riddle, D. L. Pauls, J. F. Leckman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

It seems unlikely that a solitary disturbance in serotonin function can fully account for the pathophysiology of obsessive compulsive disorder. The authors propose that some forms of obsessive compulsive disorder, e.g., obsessive compulsive disorder with a history of Tourette's syndrome, may involve a relative or absolute derangement in both brain serotoninergic and dopaminergic systems. A role for dopamine in the pathophysiology of obsessive compulsive disorder is supported by a review of the preclinical and clinical evidence. Additional studies are needed to more directly evaluate dopamine function in patients with obsessive compulsive disorder.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)36-43
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Clinical Psychiatry
Volume51
Issue number8 SUPPL.
StatePublished - Jan 1 1990

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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    Goodman, W. K., McDougle, C. J., Price, L. H., Riddle, M. A., Pauls, D. L., & Leckman, J. F. (1990). Beyond the serotonin hypothesis: A role for dopamine in some forms of obsessive compulsive disorder? Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, 51(8 SUPPL.), 36-43.