Beyond depression: Predictors of self-reported cognitive function in adults living with MS

Meghan Beier, Dagmar Amtmann, Dawn M. Ehde

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: To investigate the association between self-reported cognition and demographic/psychosocial variables in individuals with a self-reported diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS). Design: Secondary longitudinal analysis of mailed self-report surveys over a period of 2 years. Setting: Community. Participants:407 community-dwelling individuals from the Pacific Northwest with a self-reported diagnosis of MS. Main Outcome Measures: Subjective general cognitive concerns and subjective executive difficulties as measured by the Neuro-QOL Applied Cognition-Executive Function-Short Form (SF) and the Applied Cognition-General Concerns-SF. Results: Univariate and multiple linear regression analyses were used to identify statistically significant longitudinal predictors of perceived cognitive difficulties 2 years later. Fatigue and anxiety were statistically significant predictors of general cognitive concerns. Fatigue and perceived stress were statistically significant predictors of perceived executive difficulties. Fatigue was the strongest predictor in both models. Conclusions: In MS, perceived cognitive impairment is frequently linked to depression without consideration of other possible contributors. This study suggests that in people with MS, fatigue is a stronger predictor of self-reported cognitive function 2 years later than depression.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)254-262
Number of pages9
JournalRehabilitation Psychology
Volume60
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2015

Fingerprint

Cognition
Multiple Sclerosis
Fatigue
Depression
Northwestern United States
Independent Living
Executive Function
Self Report
Linear Models
Anxiety
Regression Analysis
Demography
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

Keywords

  • Metacognition
  • Multiple sclerosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Rehabilitation

Cite this

Beyond depression : Predictors of self-reported cognitive function in adults living with MS. / Beier, Meghan; Amtmann, Dagmar; Ehde, Dawn M.

In: Rehabilitation Psychology, Vol. 60, No. 3, 01.08.2015, p. 254-262.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Objective: To investigate the association between self-reported cognition and demographic/psychosocial variables in individuals with a self-reported diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS). Design: Secondary longitudinal analysis of mailed self-report surveys over a period of 2 years. Setting: Community. Participants:407 community-dwelling individuals from the Pacific Northwest with a self-reported diagnosis of MS. Main Outcome Measures: Subjective general cognitive concerns and subjective executive difficulties as measured by the Neuro-QOL Applied Cognition-Executive Function-Short Form (SF) and the Applied Cognition-General Concerns-SF. Results: Univariate and multiple linear regression analyses were used to identify statistically significant longitudinal predictors of perceived cognitive difficulties 2 years later. Fatigue and anxiety were statistically significant predictors of general cognitive concerns. Fatigue and perceived stress were statistically significant predictors of perceived executive difficulties. Fatigue was the strongest predictor in both models. Conclusions: In MS, perceived cognitive impairment is frequently linked to depression without consideration of other possible contributors. This study suggests that in people with MS, fatigue is a stronger predictor of self-reported cognitive function 2 years later than depression.",
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