Beliefs regarding development and early intervention among low-income african American and hispanic mothers

Dawn M. Magnusson, Cynthia S Minkovitz, Karen A. Kuhlthau, Tania M. Caballero, Kamila B. Mistry

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: Understand the role of health beliefs in shaping maternal decisions regarding help-seeking for children with developmental delay (DD) and explore differences between African American and Hispanic mothers. METHODS: Open-ended, semistructured interviews were conducted with African American and Hispanic mothers of children aged 0 to 36 months with DD. Interviews were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed by using inductive content analysis. RESULTS: Mothers (n = 22) were African American (36%) or Hispanic (64%), 25 to 34 years old (64%), had less than a high school education (59%), and had children receiving public insurance (95%). Five major themes emerged describing the role of maternal health beliefs in shaping key stages of the help-seeking pathway for children with DD: (1) "I can see" (observing other children and making comparisons); (2) "Children are different and develop in their own time" (perceiving that their child might be different, but not necessarily delayed); (3) "It's not that I don't trust the doctor" (relying on social networks rather than pediatricians to inform the help-seeking pathway); (4) "I got so much going on" (difficulty prioritizing early intervention [EI] because of competing stressors); and (5) limited and conflicting information (delaying or forgoing EI because of limited or conflicting information). Differences between African American and Hispanic mothers are also described. CONCLUSIONS: Understanding maternal health beliefs and expectations regarding DD and EI, acknowledging the influence of social networks on help-seeking, and addressing social and financial stressors are critical to ensuring that children with DD are identified and supported at an early age.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere20172059
JournalPediatrics
Volume140
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2017

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Hispanic Americans
African Americans
Mothers
Social Support
Interviews
Insurance
Education
Health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

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Beliefs regarding development and early intervention among low-income african American and hispanic mothers. / Magnusson, Dawn M.; Minkovitz, Cynthia S; Kuhlthau, Karen A.; Caballero, Tania M.; Mistry, Kamila B.

In: Pediatrics, Vol. 140, No. 5, e20172059, 01.11.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Magnusson, Dawn M. ; Minkovitz, Cynthia S ; Kuhlthau, Karen A. ; Caballero, Tania M. ; Mistry, Kamila B. / Beliefs regarding development and early intervention among low-income african American and hispanic mothers. In: Pediatrics. 2017 ; Vol. 140, No. 5.
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