Beliefs About HIV Disease and Medication Adherence in Persons Living With HIV/AIDS in Rural Southeastern North Carolina

Jeanne Kemppainen, Yeoun Soo Kim-Godwin, Nancy R. Reynolds, Valerie S. Spencer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to assess personal beliefs about the causes and meaning of having HIV disease and personal beliefs about medication adherence in persons living in rural southeastern North Carolina. Of the total sample of 34 participants, 29 (85%) were African American. The sample included 21 men (62%) and 13 women (38%), with a self-reported mean CD4 count of 499.38 (SD = 377.69) and a mean duration of HIV of 8.0 years. The majority of participants held beliefs that HIV was a serious and chronic condition and that the disease could be controlled by HIV therapies. Participants offered disparate views about whether or not the course of HIV disease was amenable to personal control. The persons who held the belief that the cause of HIV/AIDS was because of chance/bad luck (p = .03) or God's will (p < .001) were also most likely to believe that the progression of their HIV disease depended on chance or fate. The respondents currently taking HIV medication were also more likely to believe that HIV was caused by chance or bad luck (p = .038) or God's will (p = .016). The results reflect the important role of spirituality on self- regulation of illness and treatment in the rural southern culture.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)127-136
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care
Volume19
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2008
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • HIV/AIDS
  • North Carolina
  • adherence
  • beliefs
  • illness
  • rural
  • self-regulation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Advanced and Specialized Nursing

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