Behavioral and attitudinal correlates of trusted sources of covid-19 vaccine information in the US

Carl A. Latkin, Lauren Dayton, Jacob R. Miller, Grace Yi, Afareen Jaleel, Chikaodinaka C. Nwosu, Cui Yang, Oluwaseun Falade-Nwulia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

There is a critical need for the public to have trusted sources of vaccine information. A longitudinal online study assessed trust in COVID-19 vaccine information from 10 sources. A factor analysis for data reduction revealed two factors. The first factor contained politically conservative sources (PCS) of information. The second factor included eight news sources representing mainstream sources (MS). Multivariable logistic regression models were used. Trust in Dr. Fauci was also examined. High trust in MS was associated with intention to encourage family members to get COVID-19 vaccines, altruistic beliefs that more vulnerable people should have vaccine priority, and belief that racial minorities with higher rates of COVID-19 deaths should have priority. High trust in PCS was associated with intention to discourage friends from getting vaccinated. Higher trust in PCS was also associated with participants more likely to disagree that minorities with higher rates of COVID-19 deaths should have priority for a vaccine. High trust in Dr. Fauci as a source of COVID-19 vaccine information was associated with factors similar to high trust in MS. Fair, equitable, and transparent access and distribution are essential to ensure trust in public health systems’ abilities to serve the population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number56
JournalBehavioral Sciences
Volume11
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2021

Keywords

  • COVID-19
  • Health behaviors
  • Health disparities
  • Information sources
  • SARS-CoV-2
  • Trust
  • Vaccine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Development
  • Genetics
  • Psychology(all)
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

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