Baseline prostate-specific antigen testing at a young age

Stacy Loeb, H Ballentine Carter, William J. Catalona, Judd W. Moul, Fritz H. Schroder

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Context: Prostate cancer screening is highly controversial, including the age to begin prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing. Several studies have evaluated the usefulness of baseline PSA measurements at a young age. Objective: Review the literature on baseline PSA testing at a young age (≤60 yr) for the prediction of prostate cancer risk and prognosis. Evidence acquisition: PubMed was searched for English-language publications on baseline PSA and prostate cancer for the period ending April 2011. Evidence synthesis: In most published series, median PSA levels in the general male population range from approximately 0.4 to 0.7 ng/ml in men in their 40s and from approximately 0.7 to 1.0 ng/ml in men in their 50s. Evidence from both nonscreening and screening populations has demonstrated the predictive value of a single baseline PSA measurement for prostate cancer risk assessment. Specifically, men with baseline PSA levels above the age-group-specific median have a greater risk of prostate cancer diagnosis during the next 20-25 yr. Additional studies confirmed that higher baseline PSA levels at a young age are also associated with a greater risk of aggressive disease, metastasis, and disease-specific mortality many years later. Conclusions: Baseline PSA measurements at a young age are significant predictors of later prostate cancer diagnosis and disease-specific outcomes. Thus baseline PSA testing may be used for risk stratification and to guide screening protocols.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-7
Number of pages7
JournalEuropean Urology
Volume61
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2012

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Prostate-Specific Antigen
Prostatic Neoplasms
Early Detection of Cancer
PubMed
Population
Publications
Language
Age Groups
Neoplasm Metastasis
Mortality

Keywords

  • Baseline
  • Prognosis
  • Prostate-specific antigen
  • Screening
  • Young age

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urology

Cite this

Baseline prostate-specific antigen testing at a young age. / Loeb, Stacy; Carter, H Ballentine; Catalona, William J.; Moul, Judd W.; Schroder, Fritz H.

In: European Urology, Vol. 61, No. 1, 01.2012, p. 1-7.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Loeb, Stacy ; Carter, H Ballentine ; Catalona, William J. ; Moul, Judd W. ; Schroder, Fritz H. / Baseline prostate-specific antigen testing at a young age. In: European Urology. 2012 ; Vol. 61, No. 1. pp. 1-7.
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