Baseline delayed verbal recall predicts response to high definition transcranial direct current stimulation targeting the superior medial frontal cortex

Hsueh Sheng Chiang, Michael Motes, Rachel O'Hair, Sven Vanneste, Michael Kraut, John Hart

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Anodal high definition transcranial direct current stimulation (HD-tDCS) targeting the pre-supplementary motor area/dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (pre-SMA/dACC) has recently been shown to improve verbal retrieval deficits in veterans with chronic traumatic brain injury (TBI) (Motes et al., 2020), but predictors of treatment response are unclear. We hypothesized that baseline delayed verbal recall, a sensitive measure for post-TBI chronic cognitive decline, would predict therapeutic effects of HD-tDCS targeting the pre-SMA/dACC for verbal retrieval deficits. Standardized verbal retrieval measures were administered at baseline, immediately after and 8 weeks after treatment completion. We applied mixed generalized linear modeling as a post-hoc subgroup analysis to the verbal retrieval scores that showed significant improvement in Motes at el. (2020) to examine effects of active stimulation across the groups with baseline-intact delayed recall (N = 10) and baseline-impaired delayed recall (N = 8), compared to sham (N = 7). Individuals with impaired baseline delayed recall showed significant improvement (compared to baseline) in both category fluency and color-word inhibition/switch, while individuals with intact delayed recall showed significant improvement only in color-word inhibition/switch. Baseline delayed verbal recall may therefore be considered as a predictor for future electromodulation studies targeting frontal structures to treat TBI-related verbal deficits.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number136204
JournalNeuroscience Letters
Volume764
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2021

Keywords

  • dACC
  • Delayed recall
  • HD-tDCS
  • Pre-SMA
  • TBI
  • tDCS
  • Verbal fluency
  • Veterans

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

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